Enforcement

East Carrol Parish Man Cited for Nighttime Deer Hunting

Release Date: 01/04/2019

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries enforcement agents cited a Lake Providence man for alleged deer hunting violations on Jan. 1 in East Carroll Parish.

Agents cited Bobbie Harvey, 52, for taking deer during illegal hours with artificial light.

Agents received a tip from the public about shots being fired in the early morning hours in Lake Providence on Dec. 25, 2018.  Agents patrolled the area before legal shooting hours and found Harvey with a recently harvested eight point deer on Jan. 1.

During the investigation, Harvey also admitted to taking a nine point deer during the nighttime hours on the morning of Dec. 25, 2018.

Agents seized both deer.

Taking deer during illegal hours with artificial light brings a $900 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail.  Harvey may also face civil restitution totaling $3,658 for the replacement value of the two deer.

LDWF Enforcement Division Welcomes 12 New Agents at Graduation

Release Date: 01/04/2019

LDWF Enforcement Division Welcomes 12 New Agents at Graduation

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Law Enforcement Academy today, Jan. 4, graduated its 32nd class of cadets into the ranks of LDWF Enforcement Division agents at a ceremony in Baton Rouge.

After six months of training at the academy, 12 newly commissioned agents are ready to begin enforcing hunting, fishing and boating regulations that govern the use of the state's natural resources.

LDWF Secretary Jack Montoucet was the keynote speaker at the ceremony.  “Your qualifications are impressive and your commitment to complete the training speaks for itself,” said LDWF Secretary Jack Montoucet in his address to the first class of cadets to start and complete training under his administration. “I congratulate you all on becoming part of a great team – a family – whose goal is to protect and serve the people, visitors, and the fish and wildlife resources of Louisiana.”

Col. Sammy Martin, head of the LDWF Enforcement Division, presented certificates and recited the Oath of Office making the cadet’s transition to commissioned agents official.  “Congrats are in order as we welcome these 12 new graduates into the ranks of agents,” said Col. Martin.  “Completing six months of training gives us and them the confidence they will be able to take the next step as agents in what we hope are long and successful careers with the Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division.”

The 12 new agents are:

Michael Blanchard, of Breaux Bridge, assigned to Southern Strike Force
Cole Cupit, of Vidalia, assigned to Concordia Parish
Raymond Davis, of Jena, assigned to Catahoula Parish
Nicholas Firmin, of Ville Platte, assigned to East Baton Rouge Parish
Jeremy Foret, of Morgan City, assigned to St. Mary Parish
Kevin Hawkins, of Gadsden, Ala., assigned to Assumption Parish
Christopher Hebert, of Prairieville, assigned to Southern Strike Force
Adriel Herrera, of El Paso, Texas, assigned to Allen Parish
Dalton Herrington, of Minden, assigned to Bossier Parish
Nelson Kennerson, of Carencro, assigned to Iberville Parish
Suni Nelson, of Lafayette, assigned to Winn Parish
Emily Sexton, of Shongaloo, assigned to Northern Strike Force

During the graduation ceremony, Firmin received the firearms award given for the best marksman in the class.  Nelson received the physical training award for being the most fit.  Nelson received the academic award for having the highest grades.  Nelson also won the overall award, which is a cumulative score from the firearms, academic and physical training categories.

Montoucet also greeted the family of Immanuel Washington. Washington died during cadet training last year.

“I have to make a presentation that no one in my position ever wants to make,” he said to Washington’s wife, family and the audience. “An unexpected death is never easy to explain and at the age of 38, it is even harder to accept.”

He presented Washington’s wife, Lakesha, with a plaque honoring her husband. The department also engraved Washington’s name on LDWF enforcement’s Fallen Agents Monument.

At the academy, cadets train to enforce the state's recreational boating laws, the state and federal wildlife and fisheries laws and general law enforcement work on the state's many wildlife management areas.  The academy also covers general law enforcement training equal to that of other state law enforcement officers.

The graduating agents fill vacancies in LDWF’s Enforcement Division and will be assigned to a field-training officer for their first six months of duty.  Now part of the agency’s commissioned officer staff, the agents will join the ranks of those patrolling land and water to primarily detect game, fish and boating law violations.  These duties require travel into Louisiana's forests, swamps, fields, streams, bayous, lakes, marshlands, the Gulf of Mexico and on the state roadway system.

Mississippi Man Cited for Hunting License Fraud

Release Date: 01/04/2019

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries enforcement agents cited a Mississippi man for alleged hunting violations on Dec. 29 in West Carroll Parish.

Agents cited Anthony W. Kessler, 28, for fraudulently obtaining a hunting license, and hunting without non-resident basic and big game hunting licenses.

During a compliance check, agents discovered that Kessler did not meet the state’s bona fide resident rules for resident license status.  Agents found that Kessler had not resided continuously in Louisiana for six months and his motor vehicle was registered in Mississippi.

Agents seized a seven point deer.

Obtaining a hunting license fraudulently carries a $250 to $500 fine and up to 90 days in jail.  Hunting without non-resident and big game hunting licenses each brings a $100 to $350 fine and up to 60 days in jail.  Kessler may also face civil restitution totaling $1,624 for the replacement value of the deer.

LDWF to Hold Law Enforcement Academy Graduation Friday, Jan. 4

Release Date: 01/03/2019

EVENT:  32nd Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Law Enforcement Academy Graduation.

WHEN:  Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 - 10 a.m.

WHERE:  Joe L. Herring Louisiana Room, LDWF Headquarters Building, 2000 Quail Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70808.

BACKGROUND:  The graduation will add 12 new agents to the LDWF Enforcement Division following six months of training.  The event will include the presentation of colors by the LDWF Enforcement Color Guard, presentation of awards and the Oath of Office ceremony.

LDWF agents enforce hunting, fishing and boating regulations that govern the use of the state's natural resources.  Their duties include checking hunters, fishers, dealers, restaurants, breeders, farmers and transporters for compliance with regulations governing limits, quotas, licenses, sizes, registrations, legal documents and accepted behavior.  Agents are also trained for search and rescue and maritime security missions.

If media members plan to attend the graduation, please email Adam Einck at aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

Pierre Part Man Arrested for Illegal Gun Possession

Release Date: 01/03/2019

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries enforcement agents arrested a Pierre Part man for alleged illegal possession of a firearm and hunting violations on Dec. 29 in St. Martin Parish.

Agents arrested Colt M. Leonard, for violating a protective order, hunting without a basic hunting license, hunting from a public roadway, and discharging a firearm from a public roadway.

While patrolling St. Martin Parish agents heard a gunshot coming from the vicinity of Hwy. 997.  As agents approached Hwy. 997 they observed Leonard dressed in camouflage and possessing a 12-gauge shotgun while standing on the roadway.

Agents made contact with Leonard and found that he was restricted from possessing a firearm due to a protective order.  Agents arrested Leonard and booked him into the St. Martin Parish Jail.  Agents also seized Leonard’s shotgun.

Violation of a protective order brings up to a $1,000 fine and three months to three years in jail.  Discharging a firearm from a public road carries up to a $50 fine and 30 days in jail.  Hunting from a public roadway brings a $100 to $350 fine and up to 60 days in jail.  Hunting without a basic season hunting license carries up to a $50 fine and 15 days in jail.

Three People Cited for Harvesting Oysters in Polluted Area

Release Date: 01/02/2019

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) enforcement agents cited three subjects for alleged oyster harvester violations on Dec. 28 in Terrebonne Parish.

Agents cited Madge Cortez, 61, Moyces Narciso Carlos, 48, and Mario Gomez, 41, all from Houma, for taking oysters from a polluted area.  Cortez was also cited for violating lob book requirements.

Agents observed the three subjects around 1 p.m. harvesting oysters in Bayou Dominick.  The Department of Health and Hospitals closed this area to oyster harvesting because it is currently a polluted area.

Agents seized 15 sacks of oysters and returned them to the water.

Taking oysters from an unapproved polluted area brings a $900 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail for each offense. Violating log book requirements carries a $25 fine and up to 10 days in jail.

Cortez could also face having her oyster harvester licenses revoked by LDWF for up to one year.  She could also be sentenced to perform 40 hours of community service and only be allowed to harvest oysters from a vessel that is equipped with a vessel monitoring device for up to one year.

Houma Man Cited for Oyster Violations in Terrebonne Parish

Release Date: 12/26/2018

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) enforcement agents cited a man for alleged oyster harvester violations on Dec. 26 in Terrebonne Parish.

Agents cited William R. Fitch, 31, from Houma, for taking oysters from a polluted area and unlawfully taking oysters from a private lease and failure to have written permission.

Agents observed Fitch around 10 a.m. harvesting oysters in a bayou near Four Island Dome.  Fitch was found fishing on an unapproved polluted area on a private lease without permission.

Agents seized six sacks of oysters and returned them to the water.

Taking oysters from an unapproved polluted area and unlawfully taking oysters off a private lease each brings a $900 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail for each offense.  Failure to have written permission brings a fine of $400 to $900 and up to 90 days in jail.

Fitch could also face having their oyster harvester licenses revoked by LDWF for up to one year.  He could also be sentenced to perform 40 hours of community service and only be allowed to harvest oysters from a vessel that is equipped with a vessel monitoring device for up to one year.

Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission January Meeting Moved to Jan. 8

Release Date: 12/26/2018

Dec. 26, 2018 – The January meeting of the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission is being changed from Jan. 3 to Jan. 8. The meeting will begin at 9:30 a.m. in the Joe L. Herring Room at Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries headquarters, 2000 Quail Drive in Baton Rouge.

The commission agenda will be released soon.

A public meeting for the Queen Bess Island Restoration Project for the Louisiana Trustee Implementation Group will still be held Jan. 3 at 9:30 a.m. at LDWF headquarters in the Joe L. Herring Room. To view this meeting via webinar, register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2263988295841114625
 

Two Houma Men Cited for Illegal Oyster Harvesting in Terrebonne Parish

Release Date: 12/17/2018

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries enforcement agents cited two Louisiana men for alleged oyster harvester violations on Dec. 11 in Terrebonne Parish.

Agents cited John Parker, 29, and Richard Ainsworth, 39, for taking oyster during a closed season on the Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation and taking oysters from a polluted area.

Agents observed Parker and Ainsworth around 9:30 a.m. actively dredging for oysters from the Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation.  The Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation is closed for the entire 2018-19 oyster season.  The area where Parker and Ainsworth were found dredging is also an unapproved polluted area.

Agents seized 17 sacks of oysters and returned them to the water.

Taking oysters from an unapproved polluted area and during a closed season each brings a $900 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail for each offense.  The men could also face having their oyster harvester licenses revoked by LDWF for up to one year.  The violators could also be sentenced to perform 40 hours of community service and only be allowed to harvest oysters from a vessel that is equipped with a vessel monitoring device for up to one year.

Agents Cite Six Subjects for Illegal Oyster Harvesting in Sister Lake

Release Date: 12/11/2018

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries agents cited six men in three vessels for alleged oyster harvesting violations on Dec. 11 in Terrebonne Parish.

Agents cited Danny L. Farkas Jr, 26, of Montegut, and Austin R. Cole, 22, of Chauvin, for taking oysters during a closed season and during illegal hours, taking oysters without a commercial fishing license and without a commercial gear license.  Farkas Jr. was also cited for taking oysters without an oyster harvester license and for violating log book requirements.

Agents cited Hermilo Gomez Lura, 29, and Jose Lewis Ramirez, 28, for taking oysters during illegal hours and during a closed season.  Lura was also cited for violating log book requirements and running light requirements.

Agents cited Lorenzo Aguilar Lara, 35, and Mavino Aguilar Lara, 36, for taking oysters during a closed season and during illegal hours.  Lorenzo Aguilar Lara was also cited for violating log book requirements and running light requirements.

Agents were on patrol on the Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation when they found three vessels actively dredging for oysters between 1 a.m. and 3 a.m. on Dec. 11.  The Sister Lake Public Oyster Seed Reservation is closed for the entire 2018-19 oyster season.

Agents seized a total of 75 sacks of oysters from the three vessels and returned them to the water.

Taking oysters during a closed season brings a $900 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail.  Taking oysters during illegal hours and harvesting oysters without an oyster harvester license each carries a $400 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail for each offense.  Taking oysters without a commercial fishing license and commercial gear license each brings a $250 to $500 fine and up to 90 days in jail.  Violating the running light requirement brings up to a $50 fine and up to 15 days in jail.  Violating the log book sanitation code requirements carries up to a $25 fine and up to 10 days in jail.

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