Fishing

Anglers Aren't the Only Big Winners at the Louisiana Saltwater Series Championship

Release Date: 10/11/2010

The Louisiana Saltwater Series, hosted by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, closed this weekend at Delta Marina in Empire with some monster catches at its championship tournament.  The 2010 fishing season was a banner year for the series, to promote the conservation of Louisiana’s saltwater sport fish resources through six tag and release redfish tournaments. 

Overall weight determined the grand prize winner going to the team of Bobby Abruscato and Scott Ritter, with a winning total weight of 34.11 pounds, and their largest fish weighing 9.2 pounds.   With the win, the duo was awarded a cash prize of over $2,700.

However, this tournament series serves a much larger purpose than hashing our prize money for trophy catches.  The department hopes the tournaments will create awareness and participation in their tag and release program. 

In its inaugural year, LDWF safely tagged and released 368 redfish caught throughout the series.  The results of the tagging will aid conservation efforts for redfish in the future, helping to ensure healthy populations and a successful recreational fishing industry.

“It’s not just the tournament itself, but being able to provide fish for LDWF to tag and hopefully track,” explained participating angler Christopher Bush.  “It’s definitely a win-win situation.”

Turnout for the series was excellent, with participation averaging over 30 teams for each tournament and 22 teams qualifying for the championship.  These two-angler teams qualified for the no-entry-fee championship by fishing a minimum of three Saltwater Series tournaments.     

“In light of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, we were very pleased with overall participation,” said LDWF Assistant Secretary Randy Pausina.  “We hope that these events will again create enthusiasm for fishing in Louisiana and will unite anglers and their families in this recreational pastime.”

The 2011 Louisiana Saltwater Series hopes to continue to draw redfish anglers from the Gulf Coast, offering two –angler teams the opportunity to compete in six different tournaments, including a championship.  With low entry fees, these tournaments allow anglers to fish close to home and compete for cash prizes while simultaneously giving back to the resource through tag and release fishing.

“With the oil spill behind us, we’re excited about the possibilities for next year and anticipate the tournaments to be even larger and more successful,” said Pausina.   

Participating anglers can expect a significant increase in cash and prize payouts.  The department also plans to add a few changes to the tournament format that should make it even more exciting, including a youth division. 

The department urges interested anglers to sign up for the Louisiana Cooperative Marine Sport Fish Tagging Program. Through this program, volunteer anglers provide information that is difficult, often impossible, and expensive to obtain by other means.   The target species for LDWF’s tagging program are red drum “redfish” and spotted seatrout “speckled trout.”  For additional information, interested anglers can contact fishtagging@ccalouisiana.com.

Information about the 2011 Louisiana Saltwater Series will soon be available at lasaltwaterseries.com.

For more information, contact Ashley Wethey at 225-765-5113 or awethey@wlf.la.gov.

*Photos and footageavailable upon request.    

 

LDWF Issues the 2010 Atchafalaya Basin Fishing Survey

Release Date: 10/07/2010

In an effort to better capture the requests of the fishing community of the Atchafalaya Basin, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries began mailing surveys out this week to 2,000 Louisiana resident recreational fishermen within 60 miles of the basin.  
 
This survey will collect general information about fishing practices in the Atchafalaya Basin, Henderson Lake and the Lake Verret/Grassy Lake/Lake Palourde areas.  Information will also be gathered on recommendations for current LDWF regulations in these areas.  
 
Data gathered will be compiled with biological data gather by local LDWF fisheries biologists, to assess what current regulations might be modified to reflect the wishes of the areas anglers.  Fishermen who receive the survey are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity to voice their opinion on fisheries management in the Atchafalaya Basin and surrounding areas.
 
For additional information, please contact Michael Lee Buckner at 225-763-5508 or Jack Isaacs at 225-765-2605.

2010-281

NOAA Reopens More than 5,000 Square Miles of Federal Waters Just in Time for Red Snapper Season

Release Date: 10/01/2010

Today the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced the reopening of 5,628 square miles of Gulf federal waters west of the Mississippi River to commercial and recreational fishing. This reopening accompanies the start of a special recreational red snapper season announced by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) just last week. The season began today, Oct. 1, 2010, and will remain open every Friday, Saturday and Sunday throughout Sunday, November 21. The season will then remain closed until June 1, 2011.
 
The NOAA reopening of additional federal waters today is the seventh reopening since July 22. Federal waters in the Gulf of Mexico are now 89 percent open. NOAA reports that no oil or sheen has been documented in the area since August 6.
 
The additional recreational red snapper season opening was requested by NOAA Regional Administrator Roy Crabtree in a letter sent a letter to LDWF Secretary Robert Barham last week to match the federal season reopening. Today’s reopening of federal waters opens up a crucial portion of the Gulf in which recreational red snapper fishing occurs. This may also help boost launches, marinas and private camps out of Grand Isle, Cocodrie and Venice, as they both provide close access to the newly opened area.
 
NOAA officials chose to reopen the season for red snapper due to the significant fishing closures issued this summer as a result of the Deepwater Horizon incident.  Figures suggest the recreational red snapper quota was not met at the July 24, 2010 closure date and that approximately 2.3 million pounds of the 3.4 million pound quota remains.  
 
All regulations established for recreational harvest of red snapper will be in effect for this special season.  
 
Secretary Barham was authorized by the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission at their January 2010 meeting to change or modify opening and closing dates for the recreational red snapper season in Louisiana waters to comply with changes or modifications in season dates in federal waters. This action ensures that regulations in state waters will coincide with regulations for federally managed waters.
 
For additional information on the NOAA reopening, visit http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/deepwater_horizon_oil_spill.htm .

For more information, contact Olivia Watkins at owatkins@wlf.la.gov or 225/765-2396.

 

2010-279

LDWF ANNOUNCES RETURN TO NORMAL FISHING ACTIVITY EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI

Release Date: 09/23/2010

Today, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, in coordination with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries, has ordered an emergency reopening of all fishing in 559 square miles of state waters east of the Mississippi River previously closed due to the BP oil spill. With today's action 92 percent of state waters are open.

Commercial fishing will reopen immediately today, September 23, to the harvest of finfish, crabs and shrimp in all state waters east of the Mississippi River north of the northern shore of Pass a Loutre and 29 degrees 12 minutes 40 seconds north latitude. The openings also include the recreational harvest of shrimp and crabs.

LDWF Secretary Robert Barham ordered these openings following the completion of comprehensive testing by the FDA. The FDA has advised that following extensive sensory testing and analytical chemistry results, the fish tissue samples tested from these previously closed areas are safe for consumption.

State inside waters in the Mississippi River delta south of the northern shore of Pass a Loutre and adjacent state outside waters south of 29 degrees 12 minutes 40 seconds north latitude westward to the western shore of Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River and portions of state waters in the Barataria and Terrebonne Basins will remain closed to commercial fishing until further notice.

While LDWF continues to work closely with the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals to ensure the safety of Louisiana's seafood, these openings do not include the harvest of oysters, as this activity is regulated by DHH.

For additional information, please contact Laura Deslatte at (225) 610-2363 or ldeslatte@wlf.la.gov.

 

2010-274

Lake Bistineau Update - Sept. 22, 2010

Several weeks ago, the gates at the control structure on Lake Bistineau were closed in an effort to slowly increase water levels.  Unlike last year, there has been very little precipitation in the watersheds, resulting in no water level increase above the 7 foot drawdown capacity.  

As expected, giant salvinia, especially in protected areas/pockets has increased in coverage.  

The gates will remain closed until water levels rise and salvinia coverage is evaluated at the increased water levels.  When water levels allow, we plan to initiate water level fluctuations to strand the salvinia.  Please note that water fluctuation efforts may occur prior to the lake reaching pool stage.   Rain events drive water levels in the lake.  Therefore, the department cannot provide a timeframe for fluctuation events based on this unknown.  

Part of our plan also includes continued herbicide applications on the lake.  However, maneuvering equipment for these treatments is tedious and dangerous due to low lake levels and stumpage.  Currently, some shallow areas appear to be inundated with the plant.  Many of these areas remain inaccessible to herbicide treatments, but once lake levels rise, the salvinia will disperse over a much larger space.  As the plants move to new areas, we anticipate they will be more susceptible to stranding due to water level manipulation in combination with herbicide treatments.  

Webster Parish has submitted a funding assistance request to develop a new boating access facility at the Port of Bistineau to allow boating access during drawdown periods.  The department will consider this request once parish officials submit a finalized application.  

Those interested in removing cypress trees during the drawdown period are asked to contact James Seales (318) 371-3063 in our Minden office.  We will consider issuance of a permit on a case by case basis, based on the need.   We require that all trees be cut to the mud line and removed from the lake.  

Mapping of the lake bottom is not expected to be complete until the lake level reaches pool stage sometime this winter.  A contour map is necessary to finish our assessment of shallow lagoons in preparation of our request to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to conduct specific dirt work.  These lagoons serve as an exceptional habitat for salvinia growth.  In our plan, we discuss the need to address those areas cut off from draining during drawdown events.  

A fly-over of the lake is planned in the near future to help us understand more about giant salvinia coverage during the drawdown and identify those areas cut off from draining.

Please continue to use our Website to submit your comments and questions.  Your input is important to us, and we encourage everyone to stay actively engaged.
   
Mark McElroy

Fisheries Biologist
 

Red Snapper Season to Reopen on Weekends Beginning October 1

Release Date: 09/22/2010

Today the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) announced recreational fishing for red snapper will reopen in state waters on Friday, October 1, 2010.  The season will remain open every Friday, Saturday and Sunday throughout Sunday, November 21.  The season will then remain closed until June 1, 2011.
 
NOAA Regional Administrator, Roy Crabtree, sent a letter to LDWF Secretary Robert Barham this week, requesting the reopening of red snapper season in state waters to match the federal season reopening.  
 
NOAA officials chose to reopen the season for red snapper due to the significant fishing closures issued this summer as a result of the Deepwater Horizon incident. Figures suggest the recreational red snapper quota was not met at the July 24, 2010 closure date and that approximately 2.3 million pounds of the 3.4 million pound quota remains.  
 
All regulations established for recreational harvest of red snapper will be in effect for this special season.  
 
Secretary Barham was authorized by the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission at their January 2010 meeting to change or modify opening and closing dates for the recreational red snapper season in Louisiana waters to comply with changes or modifications in season dates in federal waters.  This action ensures that regulations in state waters will coincide with regulations for federally managed waters.

For more information, contact Harry Blanchet at hblanchet@wlf.la.gov or 225/765-2889.

 

2010-273

Six Men Cited for Fishing Violations on East Carroll Parish Waters

Release Date: 09/22/2010

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents cited six men for allegedly taking and possessing over the limit of freshwater bass on four different days in September in East Carroll Parish.

On Sept. 10, agents found Stephen M. Lewis, 50, of Clinton Miss., with 14 bass in his live well in Albemarle Lake.  On Sept. 11, an agent returned to Albemarle Lake and found Robert Purvis, 56, of Tallulah, in possession of 11 bass.

On Sept 16, agents found Leigh T. Fraysier, 47, and Brannon Cooper, 56, both of Vicksburg, Miss., fishing in Chotard Lake and in possession of 22 bass.  Each subject claimed to have taken an equal amount of fish.  Therefore, both subjects were charged with taking and possessing over the limit of freshwater bass.  

On Sept. 20, agents found Tony Wuarnock, 51, of Jackson, Miss., to be in possession of 11 bass.  During the same patrol, agents contacted a separate vessel occupied by Charles M. Bryant Jr., 39, also of Jackson, Miss., and found him to be in possession of 11 bass.

The daily limit for largemouth bass is 10 per person.

The six men face fines up to $350, or jail time up to 30 days, or both plus court costs.  A court order for restitution for the value of the illegally taken fish will also be filed with the case.

Agents involved in the cases were Sgt. Wayne Parker, Sgt. Darren Bruce, Sgt. James Hagan and Senior Agent Justin Lee.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at aeinck@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2465.

 

2010-271

Hunting and Fishing Advisory Education Council Meeting Agenda

Release Date: 09/15/2010

Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2010 - 1:30 p.m.
Louisiana Room
Louisiana Dept. of Wildlife & Fisheries Headquarters
2000 Quail Drive, Baton Rouge, La.  70808

1.    Roll Call

2.    Approval of Minutes of March 16, 2010

3.    Welcome and Opening Comments Chairman

4.    Enforcement Division Report: Oil Spill Response

5.    Bird Rescue Mission: Oil Spill Response Office of Wildlife, Coastal & Non-game Resources Division

6.    2010-11 Duck Season Forecast / Oil Spill Impacts on Habitat Office of Wildlife, Wildlife Division

7.    Fisheries Report: Oil Spill Response Office of Fisheries, Research Division

8.    Set Next Meeting Date

9.    Receive Public Comments

10.    Adjournment

 

 

2010-269

application/pdf icon Management of Recreational and Farm Ponds in Louisiana

Commercial Saltwater Size and Take Limits

COBIA (LING OR LEMON FISH)
33 inches minimum fork length. Two fish per person. Licensed commercial fishermen may only possess and sell two fish per trip.
DRUM
Black: 16 inches minimum total length. There is an annual harvest quota of 3.25 million pounds for black drum measuring 16-27 inches total length, and an annual
harvest of 300,000 fish measuring longer than 27 inches total length. Fishing year begins Sept. 1.
Red: Commercial take of red drum is prohibited.
FLOUNDER, SOUTHERN
10 fish for each licensed fisherman for each consecutive day on the water EXCEPT any commercial shrimping vessels may retain and any commercial fisherman may sell all Southern flounder caught as bycatch on any shrimping trip.
MACKEREL
King: 24 inches minimum fork length. There is a 3,000 pound trip limit in effect. Fishing year begins July 1. (Federal permit is required when fishing in federal waters.)
Spanish: 12 inches minimum fork length. (Federal permit
is required when fishing in federal waters.)
SHEEPSHEAD
10 inches minimum total length.
MENHADEN
Legal Gear - Purse Seine: Cannot be used to take finfish
other than menhaden or herring like species. Use is otherwise prohibited in inside or outside waters as delineated
in LA. R.S. 56:495.
Regular Menhaden Season: The season for the taking of menhaden as well as processing of menhaden shall be from the third Monday in April (April 19, 2010) through Nov. 1. The menhaden season shall apply to all waters seaward of the inside-outside line described in R.S. 56:495 including waters in the Federal Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), and in Chandeleur and Breton Sounds LAC 76:VII.307.D. All other inside waters and passes are permanently closed to menhaden fishing.
Menhaden Bait Season: runs from after the close of theregular menhaden season until Dec. 1. If the quota has not been reached by Dec. 1, then, beginning on April 1 of the following year, bait gulf menhaden may be taken until LDWF determines that the quota (3,000 metric tons) has been met. Any menhaden taken pursuant to this special season shall be sold only for use as bait. The Secretary shall grant special permits for the taking of menhaden during the special bait season.
Anyone legally harvesting menhaden cannot possess more than 5 percent, by weight, of any species other than menhaden and herring-like species.
MULLET, STRIPED
Mullet Permit: The commercial fisherman (captain) is required to qualify and purchase a mullet permit to commercially
harvest mullet. Mullet permit required in addition
to other licenses, qualifications exist.
Qualifying criteria for Mullet Permit are:

  1. applicant must have possessed a valid saltwater gill net license during two of the years 1993, 1994 or 1995.
  2. applicant must provide positive proof, in the form of state and federal income tax returns, including Schedule C of the federal 1040 form, submitted in accordance with procedures established by the commission, that the applicant has derived more than fifty percent of his income earned from the capture and sale of seafood species in at least two of the three years, 1993, 1994 or 1995.

Legal Gear - Mullet Strike Net: Mullet may only be taken commercially with a mullet strike net. One and three-fourth inches square or three and one-half inches stretched mesh (minimum). No mullet strike net in use can exceed 1,200 feet in length or be unattended by the licensee thereof. Mullet strike nets may only be used in state waters for the legal taking of striped mullet with a special mullet permit during the commercial season.
Commercial season: from the third Monday in October (Oct. 18, 2010) until the third Monday in January (Jan. 17, 2011). No commercial harvest of mullet is allowed outside this season. Mullet strike nets may be used Monday through Friday from sunrise to sunset. Only one mullet strike net may be in use from any vessel at any time. A commercial fisherman must have in possession
a valid LDWF mullet permit in his name for legal harvest and sale. Mullet strike nets must be tagged with an LDWF issued tag. No other fish may be possessed when mullet fishing.
Strike net gear licenses are non-transferable.

POMPANO, FLORIDA
Pompano Permit: A commercial fisherman is required to obtain a pompano permit to commercially harvest and sell pompano using a pompano strike net in Breton and Chandeleur sounds during the pompano season.
Legal Gear - Pompano Strike Net: In addition to other legal gears, Florida pompano can be harvested with pompano strike nets in seasons and areas described below. Two and one-half inches square or five inches stretched mesh (minimum). No pompano strike net in use shall exceed 2,400 feet in length or be unattended by the licensee thereof. Pompano strike nets may only be used for the legal taking of pompano in the waters in excess of seven feet in depth and beyond 2,500 feet from land within the Chandeleur and Breton Sound areas described in R.S. 56:406(A)(2). Pompano strike nets may be used from Aug. 1-Oct. 31 of each year.

REEF FISH
To commercially harvest or sell certain reef fish species
listed below (triggerfishes, amberjacks, wrasses, snappers, groupers and tilefishes) whether taken within or without the territorial waters of Louisiana, fishermen must possess a permit issued by the National Marine Fisheries Service for the Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Resources. Contact:
National Marine Fisheries Service,
Southeast Regional Office
263 13th Avenue South
St. Petersburg, FL 33701
(727) 824-5305
(For permit related inquiries 727-824-5326)
For a person on board a vessel to fish for or possess Gulf Reef fish in the Gulf EEZ, the vessel must possess on board and such person must use the gear as specified below:

  1. Non-stainless steel circle hooks - required when fishing with natural baits for reef fish
  2. Dehooking device - at least one device is required and must be used to remove hooks embedded in Gulf reef fish with minimum damage.
    • A. The hook removal device must be constructed to allow the hook to be secured and the barb shielded without re-engaging during the removal process.
    • B. The dehooking end must be blunt and all edges rounded.
    • C. The device must be of a size appropriate to secure the range of hook sizes and styles used in the Gulf reef fish fishery.
  3. Venting tool - at least one venting tool is required and must be used to deflate the swim bladders of Gulf reef fish to release the fish with minimum damage.
    • A. This tool must be a sharpened, hollow instrument, such as a hypodermic syringe with the plunger removed, or a 16-gauge needle fixed to a hollow wooden dowel. A tool such as a knife or an ice pick may not be used.
    • B. The venting tool must be inserted into the fish at a 45 degree angle approximately 1-2 inches (2.54-5.08 cm) from the base of the pectoral fin.
    • C. The tool must be inserted just deep enough to release the gases, so that the fish may be released with minimum damage.

Amberjack, Greater: 36 inches minimum fork length. Closed season March 1 - May 31 each year.
Amberjack, Lesser: 14 inches minimum fork length and 22 inches maximum fork length.
Rudderfish, Banded: 14 inches minimum fork length and 22 inches maximum fork length.
Seabass, Black: Eight inches minimum total length.
Triggerfish, Grey: 14 inches minimum total length.
Grouper*: Commercial harvest of grouper species is limited to those persons possessing a federal commercial vessel permit issued by the National Marine Fisheries Service under the Federal Fishery Management Plan for the Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish resources, and are limited to a commercial trip limit of 6,000 pounds gutted weight of deep-water and shallow-water grouper combined per vessel, during the open seasons for each of those species groups.
Goliath (formerly called Jewfish): Take or possession of Goliath grouper within or without the waters of Louisiana is prohibited.
Nassau Grouper: Take or possession of Nassau grouper within or without the waters of Louisiana is prohibited.
Shallow-Water Grouper:
Black: 24 inches minimum total length. Commercial season closed from Feb. 15 through March 14 each year.
Gag: 24 inches minimum total length. Commercial season
closed from Feb. 15 through March 14 each year.
Red: 20 inches minimum total length. Commercial season
closed from Feb. 15 through March 14 each year.
Scamp: 16 inches minimum total length.
Yellowfin: 20 inches minimum total length.
Deep-Water Grouper: Misty, Snowy, Yellowedge, Warsaw Groupers and Speckled Hind: no minimum lengths.

Snapper:
Lane: Eight inches minimum total length.
Mutton: 16 inches minimum total length.
Vermilion (beeliner): 10 inches minimum total length. (Closed season April 22 - May 31)
Yellowtail: 12 inches minimum total length.
Schoolmaster: 12 inches minimum total length.
Cubera: 12 inches minimum total length.
Mahogany: 12 inches minimum total length.
Dog: 12 inches minimum total length.
Gray (mangrove): 12 inches minimum total length.
Hogfish: 12 inches minimum fork length.
Red**: 13 inches minimum total length.
Queen Snapper, Blackfin Snapper, Silk Snapper, Wenchman, Almaco Jack, Goldface Tilefish, Tilefish, Blackline Tilefish, Anchor Tilefish, Blueline Tilefish, Dwarf Sandperch and Sandperch: no minimum limits.
*Commercial regulations for harvest of reef fish include additional
regulations required under the NMFS Reef Fish Permit System. For grouper and tilefish an IFQ is in place in federal waters. Persons involved in the commercial harvest of these species
should contact their local and federal enforcement agents for details on these regulations
**Commercial red snapper harvest regulations include several changes to reflect requirements for Individual Fishing Quota (IFQ) regulations in federal waters off of Louisiana. In addition to a requirement for a federal commercial vessel permit for Gulf reef fish, in order to fish for, possess or land Gulf red snapper, a federal Gulf red snapper IFQ vessel endorsement must have been issued to the vessel and be on board. IFQ allocation must be assigned that is at least equal to the pounds of red snapper landed/docked at a shore side location or off loaded. On the last fishing trip of the year a vessel may exceed by 10 percent the remaining IFQ allocation. No person shall purchase, sell, exchange, barter or attempt to purchase, sell, exchange or barter any red snapper in excess of any possession limit for which federal commercial license, permit and appropriate allocation were issued.
In addition to the requirement for a federal dealer permit for Gulf reef fish, for a dealer to receive Gulf red snapper from a commercial fishing vessel he must have a federal Gulf red snapper
IFQ dealer endorsement. For a person aboard a vessel with a federal Gulf red snapper IFQ vessel endorsement to sell to anyone other than a permitted dealer, such person must also have a federal
Gulf red snapper IFQ dealer endorsement.
The owner or operator of a vessel landing red snapper is responsible for calling National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Office of Law Enforcement at least three hours, but no more than 12 hours, in advance of landing to report the time and location of landing and the name of the IFQ dealer where the red snapper are to be received. At-sea or dockside transfer of commercial red snapper from one vessel to another vessel is prohibited.

SEATROUT, SPOTTED (SPECKLED TROUT)
Spotted Seatrout Permit: In addition to other commercial
fishing licenses a qualified commercial fisherman must have in possession a valid Spotted Seatrout permit to commercially harvest and sell spotted seatrout.  The commercial
fisherman (captain) is required to qualify and purchase
a spotted seatrout permit to commercially harvest and sell spotted seatrout. A saltwater guide may not possess
a spotted seatrout permit.
Qualifying criteria for Spotted Seatrout Permit are:

  1. applicant must have possessed a valid saltwater gill net license during two of the years 1993, 1994 or 1995.
  2. applicant must provide positive proof, in the form of state and federal income tax returns, including Schedule C of the federal 1040 form, submitted in accordance with procedures established by the commission,

that the applicant has derived more than fifty percent of his income earned from the capture and sale of seafood species in at least two of the three years, 1993, 1994 or 1995.
Legal Gear: Spotted seatrout may be taken only by properly licensed and permitted commercial rod-and-reel fishermen. No commercial gear other than commercial
rod-and-reel may be used or in possession to take spotted seatrout. All persons on board a vessel commercially
fishing for spotted seatrout shall be validly licensed commercial fishermen. Only the spotted trout permit holder may sell spotted seatrout.
Size: 14 inches total minimum total length, with an annual harvest quota of one million pounds.
Seasons/Times: Commercial fishing begins on the second
day of January until the last day of July or until the quota is reached, whichever comes first. Spotted seatrout
may not be taken commercially during the period from official sunset on Friday through official sunrise on Monday, and there shall be no possession of spotted seatrout in excess of the recreational limit during theperson holding a permit for the commercial taking or possession of spotted seatrout may take or possess an amount not to exceed the legal recreational limit of spotted
seatrout between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. during the open season and at any time during the closed season if that person also possesses a basic recreational
fishing license and a saltwater fishing license.
It is illegal to possess spotted seatrout on a vessel where there is a gill net, strike net, hoop net, trammel net or seine or other commercial gear. No person shall qualify for a charter boat fishing guide license and a spotted seatrout permit during the same licensure period.

HIGHLY MIGRATORY SPECIES
Tuna, swordfish and sharks possessed by a commercial
fisherman shall not be skinned or scaled until set or put on shore or when sold. Those species of tuna which have minimum size restrictions may have the head removed as long as the carcass length without the head exceeds the minimum size requirement.

Shark:
NOTE: There are proposed rules that could significantly
modify rules for the harvest of sharks. Harvesters and wholesale/retail dealers interested in harvesting shark should remain aware of the current regulations.
Persons commercially fishing for shark are required to obtain a shark permit from LDWF. In addition to other commercial licenses and state shark permits, persons
commercially fishing for sharks in federal waters are required to have a federal shark permit. Note: There is a trip limit of 33 fish per trip and per day for large coastal sharks, which are the following: great hammerhead,
scalloped hammerhead, smooth hammerhead, nurse shark, blacktip shark, bull shark, lemon shark, sandbar shark, silky shark, spinner shark, tiger shark. Persons possessing a Commercial State Shark Permit shall not possess any sandbar sharks unless they also have in their name and in possession a valid Federal Shark Research permit under 50CFR635.32(1). The act of “finning” and possession of fins in excess of 5 percent
of the weight of shark carcasses are prohibited. All sharks aboard a vessel shall have fins naturally attached to the original shark carcass by at least some portion of uncut skin. No person aboard any vessel shall transfer or cause the transfer of sharks between vessels on state or federal waters. All Louisiana state waters out to the seaward
boundary of the Louisiana Territorial Sea shall be closed to the commercial harvest of all sharks between April 1 - June 30 of each year. The fishing year for shark shall begin on Jan. 1. The opening date for the commercial
shark season may be set at some date other than Jan. 1, and the closure of the fishery may be done on short notice as quotas are achieved, so participants in this fishery
must remain aware of seasons as well as the potential
for other rule changes.
Shark Permit: A commercial fisherman is required to acquire a shark permit to commercially harvest shark.
Prohibited Shark Species: No person shall take, possess,
purchase, sell, barter, exchange or attempt to possess,
purchase, sell, barter or exchange any of the following
species or parts thereof:
Atlantic angel shark
Caribbean sharpnose shark
sand tiger shark
basking shark
dusky shark
sevengill shark
bigeye sand tiger shark
Galapagos shark
sixgill shark
bigeye sixgill shark
largetooth sawfish
smalltail shark
bigeye thresher shark
longfin mako
smalltooth sawfish
bignose shark
narrowtooth shark
whale shark
Caribbean reef shark
night shark
white shark

Swordfish: 29 inches carcass length or 33 pounds dressed weight. To commercially harvest, possess or sell swordfish, whether within or outside Louisiana state territorial
waters, fishers must possess a valid Federal Commercial Swordfish Permit aboard the vessel. No person aboard any vessel shall transfer or cause the transfer of swordfish between vessel on state or federal waters.

Tuna: In addition to state required commercial fishing licenses, to commercially harvest, possess or sell Atlantic bluefin tuna, yellowfin tuna, bigeye tuna, skipjack tuna and albacore, whether within or outside Louisiana state territorial waters, fishers must possess a valid Federal Commercial Tuna Permit (1-888-USA-TUNA).
Person subject to the jurisdiction of the state, fishing for tunas within or without Louisiana state waters, are subject
to both state and federal laws, rules and regulations. Federal regulations on recreational harvest of tunas change often, especially for bluefin tuna. Prior to harvest of tuna, be aware of the most current federal regulations on harvest, including sizes, bag limits and closed seasons.
The “Atlantic Tunas Regulations Brochure” is available at: http://www.nmfspermits.com/library.asp and announcements of changes may be accessed via the Web at: http://www.nmfspermits.com/newes.asp. 
Following are permanent Louisiana regulations on tuna harvest, which may be superseded by seasonal changes within the federal regulatory system. See websites referenced above for current federal regulations.

Yellowfin: 27 inches Curved Fork Length (CFL)
Bigeye: 27 inches Curved Fork Length (CFL)
Bluefin: 27 inches Curved Fork Length (CFL)

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