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Four Men Cited for Squirrel Hunting Violations in Winn Parish

Release Date: 10/11/2018

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries agents cited four men for alleged squirrel hunting violations on Oct. 6 in Winn Parish.

Agents cited Joshua Young, 24, and Ernest Nowlin, 64, both of Tullos, for possessing over the limit of squirrels.  Agents also cited Michael Sullivan, 50, of Olla, and Richard Decker, 54, of Tullos, for hunting squirrels without a basic hunting license.

Agents received a complaint that hunters were taking too many squirrels so they set up surveillance on a hunting camp.  The men arrived back at the camp from their opening day squirrel hunt when agents made contact with the men.?

Agents found Young in possession of 16 squirrels, Nowlin in possession of 10 squirrels.  The legal daily bag limit is eight squirrels per licensed hunter for the fall and winter season.  Agents also found Sullivan in possession of seven squirrels and Decker one squirrel with no hunting licenses.

Possessing over the limit of squirrels brings a $250 to $500 fine and up to 90 days in jail.  The men may also face civil restitution up to $365 for the replacement value of the illegally taken squirrels.  Hunting squirrels without a basic hunting license carries up to a $50 fine and 15 days in jail.  Agents seized the 34 squirrels.

Mansfield Man To Pay Over $6,000 for Wildlife Violations

Release Date: 10/09/2018

A Mansfield man was convicted in Desoto and Bossier parishes for multiple wildlife violations.

Frank Canizaro Jr., 30, was convicted in Bossier Parish on Sept. 26 for selling deer and failing to comply with deer tagging or harvest record requirements.  He was fined $839 and has to pay $692 in court costs and $4,069 in civil restitution.  Canizaro also lost all hunting privileges for one year.

He was also convicted in Desoto Parish on Oct. 3 for selling deer, selling squirrels and failing to comply with deer tagging or harvest record requirements.  Canizaro Jr. was fined $500 and received six months of probation.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) enforcement agents received a complaint about Canizaro Jr. selling squirrels and deer in 2016.  An undercover LDWF agent made contact with Canizaro Jr. in November of 2016.

The undercover LDWF agents purchased deer and squirrel from Canizaro Jr. in November and December of 2016 in both Desoto and Bossier parishes.  LDWF agents arrested Canizaro Jr. on Jan. 28, 2018 for selling deer and squirrels and failing to comply with deer tagging requirements in Desoto and Bossier parishes.

LOUISIANA ON THE RIGHT TRACK

Release Date: 10/05/2018

There's a breeze of hope sweeping across the state of Louisiana, with many of our most difficult challenges now in the rearview mirror. Not too long ago, our state was trapped in a cycle of budget battles that threatened everything from health care to education. But after lots of hard work and a sustained commitment to put Louisiana first, those days are now behind us.

 

There's a breeze of hope sweeping across the state of Louisiana, with many of our most difficult challenges now in the rearview mirror. Not too long ago, our state was trapped in a cycle of budget battles that threatened everything from health care to education. But after lots of hard work and a sustained commitment to put Louisiana first, those days are now behind us.

LDWF Secretary Jack Montoucet names Robert Shadoin as Deputy Secretary

Release Date: 10/05/2018

LDWF Secretary Jack Montoucet names Robert Shadoin as Deputy Secretary

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Secretary Jack Montoucet has named former State Representative Robert E. Shadoin as Deputy Secretary of LDWF. Shadoin will begin on Monday (Oct. 8).

The Ruston republican and attorney recently left the Louisiana Legislature where he represented the 12th District in the Louisiana House of Representatives. His district included Lincoln and Union parishes.

Shadoin is a graduate of Ruston High. He has a Bachelor of Business Administration from Louisiana Tech University and a law degree from the LSU Law Center. He served as Ruston City Attorney from 1991-1994 and from 1994-2006, he was a member of the Lincoln Parish School Board.

He and his wife, the former Carol Brasuell, have four children.

LDWF and Grand Isle Levee District Mutually Agree to Terminate Elmer’s Island Airstrip Agreement

Release Date: 10/05/2018

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Secretary Jack Montoucet announced Thursday (Oct. 4) that an agreement to essentially lease land to the Grand Isle Independent Levee District for the development of an airstrip on Elmer’s Island has been terminated. The announcement came during the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission monthly meeting in Baton Rouge on Thursday.

The proposal had stirred criticism from conservation groups and others. Secretary Montoucet addressed the commissioner’s and provided the department’s rationale for entering the agreement and offered assurances that any future discussion on this topic would be vetted by the full commission.  During Secretary Montoucet’s prepared remarks he stated, “I am surely not too proud to recognize and understand the criticism and concerns that have been raised, both in regards to the environmental concerns with the project, but also as it relates to the desires for the public to have involvement beyond the permitting process for this proposal.”

Grand Isle mayor David Camardelle appeared at Thursday’s meeting and supported Montoucet’s decision to end the agreement.

 

A full transcript of Secretary Jack Montoucet’s remarks can be found below.

 

Mr. Chairman and members of the Commission:

I come before you today to inform you that the agreement to allow the Grand Isle Levee District the opportunity to pursue permitting and construction of an airport on Elmer’s Island will be cancelled and terminated upon mutual agreement.

Judging from the volume of communications my office has received on this topic, I believe that this news will be well received by many of the folks here today and the people they represent.  However, I do feel the need to briefly explain the thought process behind the decision to execute an agreement in the first place.

Allow me to state, for the record, that many of the environmental concerns that I’ve heard are absolutely valid.  In fact, we as a conservation agency, share many of those same concerns and we expressed those concerns to Mayor Camardelle when he requested to use the old airstrip property. 

However, Mayor Camardelle indicated that he could propose a project that would have minimal impact on fish and wildlife resources and provide recreational access and economic development to the area, all at no cost to the state.  He simply asked for an opportunity to try.  Knowing the many state and federal permits that such a project would require before it could even begin to be implemented, and trusting that those permitting processes would both identify and address any potential impacts to wildlife resources or habitat, we decided to see what he could propose. 

I am confident that I speak for myself and the Governor when I say that this administration never absolutely supported the construction of an airport on Elmer’s Island, ignoring all consequences.  Rather, we endorsed the Mayor’s effort to develop a preliminary plan – a proposal – to be properly evaluated and vetted.

With that said, I am surely not too proud to recognize and understand the criticism and concerns that have been raised, both in regards to the environmental concerns with the project, but also as it relates to the desires for the public to have involvement beyond the permitting process for this proposal. 

I assure you that I value open and transparent government and that it was NOT my intention to create an appearance of operating outside of the public eye.  However, it is evident from the number of people here today and from the communications I’ve received that folks would like a greater opportunity for public discourse in this matter.

For that reason, I’m glad that Mayor Camardelle was gracious enough and willing to agree to mutually cancel and terminate the current intergovernmental agreement.  You have my word that if this proposal is ever considered in the future, it will be done through the Commission and would initially be limited to a feasibility study to allow for appropriate and public evaluation.

Mayor Camardelle is present here today.  He has been a passionate advocate for his town, a fair representative of the Grand Isle Independent Levee District, and a longtime supporter of this agency. I’d like to publicly thank him for his cooperation in this endeavor and offer an opportunity to address the Commission.

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov. To receive email alerts, signup at http://www.wlf.la.gov/signup

Three Men Cited for Oyster Violations

Release Date: 10/04/2018

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries enforcement agents cited three Galiano men for alleged oyster violations in LaFourche Parish on Sept. 18.

Agents cited Carl J. Leblanc Jr., 42, Chad Martin, 22, and Bobby W. Taylor, 19, for taking oysters from a polluted area, taking oysters during illegal hours and intentional concealment of oysters.

Agents received a complaint about a vessel dredging for oysters in an area deemed to be polluted by the Department of Health and Hospitals (DHH).  Agents setup surveillance and found an oyster vessel with Leblanc Jr., Martin and Taylor on board inside the polluted area.

During questioning, one of the men confessed that they were dredging for oysters the night before and that they offloaded their catch onto the bank when they thought agents might be suspecting them of their illegal activity.

Agents found 18 sacks of oysters on the bank one of which had a tag with Leblanc Jr.’s information filled out.  Agents seized the oysters and returned them to the water.

In a separate case, agents also cited Leblanc Jr. for taking oysters from a polluted area on Feb. 13, 2018.

Taking oysters from a polluted area and intentional concealment of oysters each brings a $900 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail for each offense.  Taking oysters during illegal hours carries a $400 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail.

LDWF Cites Two Men for Over Limit of Bass

Release Date: 10/04/2018

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries enforcement agents cited two Louisiana men for alleged fishing violations on Sept. 21 in Terrebonne Parish.

Agents cited Ray Louviere Jr., 65, of Prairieville, and Robert Holland, 80, of Livingston, for possessing over the limit of black bass.

Agents received a complaint about fishermen possessing over the legal limit of bass on Bayou Black.  Agents setup surveillance at a boat launch near Gibson where they found a truck and empty boat trailer.

When a vessel with Louviere Jr. and Holland approached the marina, agents made contact with the men.  Agents found the men in possession of 53 bass, which put them 33 over the legal limit of 10 bass per day per fisherman.

Over the limit of black bass brings a $100 to $350 fine and up to 30 days in jail.  The men may also face civil restitution totaling $443 for the replacement value of the illegally possessed fish.

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