Hunting

Marsh Bayou WMA

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
655 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(337) 491-2576

Marsh Bayou Wildlife Management Area is a 655 acre tract of land acquired from the Farmers Home Administration. The property is located in Evangeline Parish approximately 3 miles east of Oakdale, La. north of highway 10. Access to the area can only be gained off of Cypress Creek Road 3 miles north of highway 10 at the corner of Parish Road PR 4-20. Parking is limited and there are no roads within the area.
The area is flat and poorly drained and was primarily used as an agricultural rice farm for many years and now is being converted back to forest land. Two hundred acres of the north east corner of the property have been planted with a variety of hardwoods species. Most of the habitat consists of thick wax myrtle and sweet gum thickets with scattered pines and hardwoods. A small bayou cuts the property in half.
The area offers limited rabbit, deer and quail hunting opportunities, due to the small acreage and thick habitat conditions presently found on the area.
Additional information and maps can be obtained from the Lake Charles Office at 1213 North Lakeshore Drive, Lake Charles, La. 70601 or phone 337/491-2575.

Pomme de Terre WMA

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
6,434 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(337) 948-0255

Pomme de Terre Wildlife Management Area is located off Louisiana Highway 451, six miles east of Moreauville in East Central Avoyelles Parish. Louisiana Highway 451 connects to Louisiana Highway 1 at Moreauville or Hamburg. Vehicular access is by gravel road at the southwest corner. Interior access by water is limited, however approximately 8 miles of ATV trails provides access to the majority of the area.
Pomme de Terre is 6,434 acres in size. The initial tract was purchased by the Department in November 1975. An additional 1372 acres was purchased in 1985, along with other acquisitions, including 180 acres in 1988.
The area is low and flat. Accumulated rainwater is collected in Sutton Lake and released by a water control structure. There are several low ridges running mainly east and west.
The overstory consists mostly of hackberry, locust, elm, ash, maple, and sweetgum; nuttall oaks and overcup oaks are scattered. Willow is dominant in the low lying areas, with cypress occurring toward the ridges. There are some boxelder and sycamore.
The understory consists of haws, deciduous holly, dogwood, elderberry and saplings of the overstory. Some of the other plants are poison ivy, peppervine, greenbrier, and blackberry. Open water and marshy areas, which comprise about 60 percent of the total area, contain water hyacinth, duckweed, lotus, cutgrass, frog?s-bit and buttonbush.
Game species hunted are good populations of deer, wild turkey, squirrels and rabbits, with adequate seasonal populations of waterfowl. Trapping for furbearers is allowed by permit only.
Sport fishing on the area is poor. Commercial fishing is allowed by permit. One improved ramp for boat launching exists.
One primitive camping area is presently available.
Further information can be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 5652 Hwy 182, Opelousas, LA 70570. Phone 337-948-0255.

Pass A Loutre WMA

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Contact
Phone: 
504-284-5267

Pass-a-Loutre Wildlife Management Area is located in southern Plaquemines Parish at the mouth of the Mississippi River, approximately 10 miles south of Venice, and is accessible only by boat. The nearest public launches are in Venice. This area is owned by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and encompasses some 115,000 acres.

The area is characterized by river channels with attendant channel banks, natural bayous, and man-made canals which are interspersed with intermediate and fresh marshes. Hurricane damage and subsidence have contributed to a major demise of vegetated marsh areas resulting in formation of large ponds. Habitat development is primarily directed toward diverting sediment-laden waters into open bay systems (i.e., creating delta crevasses), which promotes delta growth.

Waterfowl and other migratory game bird hunting, rabbit hunting, and archery hunting for deer are permitted on Pass-a-Loutre.

A trapping program is conducted annually to control surplus furbearing animals and alligators.

There is excellent fishing in the freshwater areas as well as the more saline waters. Fish species present are typical inland saltwater varieties near the gulf and along river channels. Freshwater species including bass, bream, catfish, crappie, warmouth, drum, and garfish can be caught in the interior marsh ponds. Salt water species include redfish, speckled trout and flounder.

Other forms of recreation available include boating, picnicking, nature study, crabbing, and camping. There are multiple campgrounds on the WMA that are available for tent-camping and one designated area for the mooring of recreational houseboats (see maps for locations).  Prior to mooring, however, houseboats must receive a permit from the Department.  More information can be obtained by calling 337-373-0032.

 

 

Manchac

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
8,328 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(985) 543-4777

Manchac Wildlife Management Area, located in the uppermost portion of St. John the Baptist Parish about 17 miles NNE of LaPlace, was purchased from E.G. Schlieder in 1975. Entrance to the interior of the area is presently limited to various canals. The headquarters are located on the Galva Canal.
The topography is characterized by flat, low marshland subject to flooding, especially with easterly winds. Major vegetation in the past was originally bald cypress, but nearly all of this has been tagged from the area leaving an open freshwater marsh. There is a shallow freshwater pond, known as the Prairie, near the Lake Pontchartrain shoreline comprising approximately 500 acres. This is one of the better duck ponds within the Lake Pontchartrain system. Pirogues and mudboats are the major means of transportation in the Prairie.
Predominant vegetation includes bull tongue, smartweed, alligator weed, and spartina. Submerged aquatics are naiads, pondweeds, fanwort, and coontail. A strip of cypress tupelo is present along the Lake Pontchartrain boundary. The canopy is generally open and the understory consists of black willow, maple, palmetto, baccharis and assorted grasses.
The most sought after game species are waterfowl including scaup, mallard, teal, gadwall, widgeon, shoveler, coot and rail. Other species hunted include snipe, rails and rabbits. Permit trapping for alligator, nutria, muskrat and raccoon is normally allowed each year.
About 50 wood duck nesting boxes have been located at various locations to make up for the lack of mature trees with cavities in them. These man-made nesting sites have been eagerly accepted by the birds.
Other forms of recreation include fishing and birdwatching. Both bald eagles and ospreys have been sighted on the area.
Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Wildlife Division: 42371 Phyllis Ann Rd. Hammond, LA  70403 985-543-4777

Loggy Bayou WMA

Information
Owned: 
LDWF, USACOE
Acreage: 
6,381 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 371-3050

Loggy Bayou Wildlife Management Area is located in the southern most part of Bossier Parish and consists of 6,381 acres. It is owned Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Louisiana State Land Office. The area lies approximately 20 miles southeast of Bossier City. Main access into the northern portion of the area if off of Louisiana Highway 154 just east of Lake Bistineau and into the southern portion from U. S. Highway 71. The Department maintains one all-weather road and a series of ATV trails through interior of the area.
Loggy Bayou WMA lies between Loggy and Red Chute Bayous and Lake Bistineau in the Red River Alluvial Valley of northwestern Louisiana. The area is one of the few remaining bottomland, hardwood areas remaining in northwest Louisiana. The terrain is flat with approximately 90 percent of the area being subject to annual flooding from backwaters of the Red River.
The original land purchased consisted of approximately half over-grazed cattle pasture and half severely over-grazed, poor quality, bottomland forest. Wildlife Division personnel recognized the need for improving the forest component of the area. In response to the need several hundred acres of agricultural fields were planted in the early 1970's and 1980's in preferred oak species. As a result of their foresight and efforts the seedlings planted over two decades ago are now producing quality hardwood mast and shelter for the expanding squirrel and turkey populations and other wildlife now utilizing the area.
Dominant tree species are hackberry, ash, elm, honey locust. native wild pecan, overcup, water, willow and Nuttall oak. The latter four species are not in abundance but are sparsely scattered throughout the forest area. Several hundred acres of the open fields have been planted in native pecan, Nuttall, water and cherrybark oak seedlings. Underplanting of the same seedlings has been done in the forested areas. The understory consists of red haws, rattan, trumpet vine and dewberry. In the field areas poison ivy, vetch and fescue predominate along with hardwood and honey locust spouts. Annually, approximately 50 acres are either fallow disked or planted in annual supplemental food plots.
White-tailed deer, squirrel, rabbits and raccoon hunting opportunities are available on the area. Archery hunting for white-tailed deer is the featured activity with a limited amount of modern firearm and muzzleloader hunting permitted. Pope and Young quality deer are common on the area. Waterfowl hunting is featured in the 110 acres greentree reservoir and on the numerous sloughs, beaver ponds and backwater areas. Hunting for eastern wild turkey is limited to lottery only. Trapping for raccoon, beaver, mink, coyote, and other furbears is allowed and encouraged.
 
Sport and commercial fishing is permitted on the area with fishermen concentrating their efforts on catfish, gar, buffalo and carp in Loggy and Red Chute Bayous. Bass and several species of bream can also be found in the bayous. One improved boat ramp is located on the southern portion of the area on Loggy Bayou.
The area is open to bird watchers and nature study groups. Overnight camping is allowed throughout the entire year on designated camping areas.
Additional information may be obtained from the LDWF, Wildlife Division, 1401 Talton St., Minden, LA 71055. Phone (318) 371-3050.

Little River WMA

Information
Owned: 
Resource Management Service, LLC and LDWF
Acreage: 
4,164 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 487-5885

This WMA is located in Grant and LaSalle parishes approximately 8 miles northeast of Pollock, Louisiana. It consists of department owned lands and a tract provided by International Paper Company for a total of 4,164 acres. The majority of Little River WMA normally floods seasonally from late Winter through Spring.
The area is primarily bottomland hardwoods. Common tree species include overcup oak, bitter pecan, willow oak. There are also several cypress-tupelo sloughs. Swamp privet, water elm, mayhaw, and overstory regeneration make up the midstory. Understory species growth varies greatly with elevation. The higher areas within the floodplain support green briar, blackberry, and pepper vine as well a variety of annual forbs and grasses. Areas of low elevation have very limited understory growth. The upland sites are forested in pine plantations and stands of mixed pine-hardwoods. A tremendous variety of tree and understory species are found in these areas.
Primary game species on the area are squirrel, wood ducks and turkey. There is also deer, rabbit and woodcock hunting available. Good fishing is available on the river.
Access to the area is via parish roads connecting to U.S. Highway 165. Primary interior roads are improved and provide all weather access unless flooded. Additional access is provided for ATVs on marked trails.
Two camping area are maintained on the WMA. Both provide primitive camping only. One is accessible year around while the other is subject to closure during high water periods. A stone covered boat ramp provides access to the river for smaller boats.
 
Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 1995 Shreveport Highway, Pineville, Louisiana 71360. Phone(318)487-5885.

Lake Ramsey Savannah WMA

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
796 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(985) 543-4777

Recognizing the threatened status of high-quality longleaf pine flatwoods savannahs in Louisiana and the many unique native species the habitat supports, the Department acquired this 796 acres in 1992. The WMA is located in St. Tammany Parish about 7 miles northwest of Covington, and is accessible from Lake Ramsey Road west of LA HWY. 25. In recent years the Nature Conservancy has purchased additional lands along the Lake Ramsey and Horse Branch Roads that have enlarged the area now under conservation management.
The area is frequently burned to perpetuate the wide variety of ground cover plant species that occurs in a longleaf pine savannah. At least 18 rare plant species have been identified on the site which makes it one of the most significant savannahs remaining in eastern Louisiana. This unique open longleaf savannah has evolved historically only through the regular occurrence of fire. Prescribed fires will be critical in the continued future maintenance of his rare habitat.
In addition to the longleaf pine savannah, the area supports other valuable natural plant communities including: bayhead forest, small river floodplains forest, and an upland sandy stream (Tchefuncte River).
While a primary objective of the area is to conserve the unique habitats and native species, many consumptive and non-consumptive uses are permissible such as hiking, hunting (archery, small game, and waterfowl only), photography, fishing, trapping, wildlife viewing, research, and education. The area is walk-in-only. A Nature Trail is located on the south end of the WMA that originates on Nature Conservancy land. This trail is a favorite of bird watchers and school classes.
Additional information can be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Wildlife Division:
 

42371 Phyllis Ann Rd.

Hammond, LA  70403

985-543-4777

Lake Boeuf WMA

Information
Owned: 
Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
800 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(337) 373-0032
Map: 

The Lake Boeuf Wildlife Management Area is located east of Louisiana Highway 308, north of Raceland, Louisiana. The area includes approximately 800 acres of fresh marsh/swamp habitat and is accessible only by boat via Theriot Canal, Foret Canal, or Lake Boeuf.
Hunting opportunities include archery, small game, waterfowl, and unmarked hogs. The area also hosts annual youth lottery deer gun hunts. More information can be obtained by calling 337-373-0032.

Ouachita WMA

Effective March 2015, Ouachita Wildlife Management Area acreage has been consolidated within the new boundaries of Russell Sage Wildlife Management Area and will continue to be managed by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.  To view a site description and map of the combined WMAs acreage, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/wma/2777 .

Russell Sage WMA

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
34,845 Acres
Contact
Email: 
lmoak@wlf.la.gov
Phone: 
(318) 343-4044

Russell Sage Wildlife Management Area is located in Morehouse, Ouachita and Richland Parishes, approximately seven miles east of Monroe and ten miles west of Rayville.  Access is provided via U. S. Highway 80, LA Highway 15 and Interstate Highway 20.  The WMA is presently comprised of 34,845 acres following the consolidation of the former Ouachita Wildlife Management Area with Russell Sage WMA in March 2015.  The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries owns 30,651 acres, U. S. Army Corps of Engineers owns 2,954 acres and the Ouachita Parish School Board 1,240 acres.  Russell Sage WMA is distinguished by becoming the very first Department owned wildlife management area in 1960. 

Located within the Bayou LaFourche floodplain, the property is flat and poorly drained.  Elevations range from 55 to 63 feet above mean sea level.  Numerous sloughs and shallow bayous meander throughout and backwater flooding is subject to annual occurrence.  The forest canopy contains a mixture of bottomland hardwoods that are grouped into two major timber types:  oak-elm-ash and overcup oak-bitter pecan (water hickory).  Lesser acreages of cypress-tupelo gum and black willow are present.  Individual species present include Nuttal oak, honey locust, cedar elm, winged elm, sweetgum, sugarberry, willow oak, green ash, red maple, cottonwood, nutmeg hickory, bitternut hickory, and delta post oak.  Common woody understory species include peppervine, deciduous holly, poison ivy, rattan, swamp privet, buttonbush, climbing dogbane, palmetto, greenbriar, dewberry. roughleaf dogwood, trumpet creeper, persimmon, box elder, grape, and hawthorn.

Thirteen waterfowl management units totaling 7,550 acres have been developed.  Included are 500 acres of flooded agricultural fields, 4,500 acres of moist soil management units, and 2,550 acres of greentree impoundments.  Upgrades and renovations to pumping stations were completed in 2015.  These impoundments are heavily utilized by waterfowl as well as shorebirds and wading birds.  An observation tower is present which provides for public viewing of waterfowl and wetland birds.  Russell Sage is also an excellent location for viewing terrestrial birds and raptors.  An occasional black bear is sighted on the property.

Hunting is available for deer, squirrels, waterfowl, mourning doves, rabbits, raccoon and woodcock.  Trapping is permitted for furbearers such as raccoon, beaver, coyote, nutria, mink, bobcat, fox and opossum.  The river otter is present but trapping is not allowed for this species.  A limited lottery hunt is scheduled annually for the alligator.  A small game emphasis area is available which allows for additional opportunity for rabbits and squirrels.

Two camping areas are located on the WMA.  Each site offers primitive camping with the southernmost area having a source of drinking water.

Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Monroe field office, 368 CenturyLink Drive, Monroe, LA 71203, or by calling ph. (318) 343-4044.

 

 

 

Syndicate content