Hunting

Tangipahoa Parish School Board

Information
Owned: 
Tangipahoa Parish School Board
Acreage: 
1,643 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(985) 543-4777

In April of 2003 the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries entered into an agreement with the Tangipahoa Parish School Board to free-lease some of their "16" sections. The intent of both parties is to better manage wildlife and insure continued public access. The tracts leased are relatively small and scattered throughout the Parish but do offier the Public additional outdoor recreational opportunties. The first tract is located in the center of the Parish, south of La. Hwy. 16. It contains 347 acres of upland pine habitat actively managed for loblolly pine timber production. The site consists of timber stands of various ages with scattered hardwoods. Access is via Neal Road west of Briar Patch Road and La. Hwy. 445. Game species found on site include whitetail deer, turkey, squirrel, rabbit, mourning dove, bobwhite quail, and woodcock. The second site is also found south of La. Hwy. 16 and can be accessed by heading south on the Dummyline Road at the Sharon M.B. Church. This 649 acre tract is bordered on the east by the Hillcrest School Road. Longleaf pine, loblolly pine and mixed pine/hardwood habitats occur on this site. Again whitetail deer, turkey, squirrel, rabbit, mourning dove bobwhite quail, and woodcock occur on this site. The third site is located North of La. HWY. 38, near Lewiston. It can be accessed via Brumfield Lane. Whitetail deer, turkey, squirrel, rabbit, mourning dove, bobwhite quail and woodcock occur on the site. All sites require self-clearing permits. Hunting seasons on the three tracts are the same as outside except still hunt only for deer; beagles are only allowed for rabbits Jan. 24-Feb. 28; squirrel dogs are only permitted Jan. 24-Feb. 28 and Nightime raccoon hunting allowed Jan. 24-Feb. 28. No horseback riding during gun season for deer or turkey and no ATVs are allowed. For more information contact the Region 7 office at 225/765-2360.
 
42371 Phyllis Ann Rd. Hammond, LA  70403 985-543-4777

Thistlethwaite WMA

Information
Owned: 
Thistlethwaite Heirs
Acreage: 
11,100 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(337) 948-0255

Thistlethwaite Wildlife Management Area is located in north central St. Landry Parish, immediately northeast of Washington off Louisiana Highway 10. Access by I-49 also, Lebeau exit. Seventeen miles of all-weather shell roads are maintained within the area, allowing convenient access to virtually the entire tract. Approximately eleven miles of woods trails are also maintained for the convenience of hunters.
Thistlethwaite is 11,000 acres in size and is owned by Thistlethwaite heirs.
The terrain is generally flat bottomland, with a gentle north-to-south slope. Drainage is slow, with standing water for considerable periods after heavy rains.
Forest cover is predominantly oak, most commonly water oak, willow oak, overcup oak, white oak, cherrybark oak, nuttall oak, cow oak, and post oak. Other species are bitter pecan, sweet pecan, hichory, hackberry, sweetgum, ash, elm and maple. The lower areas contain cypress and tupelo gum.
Selective timber cuttings have enhanced a natural understory of dogwood, redbud, spice bush, French Mulberry, greenbriar, rattan, blackberry, and many others. Choice browse plants are dogwood and wild lettuce. Japanese honeysuckle grows profusely. Game species are deer, squirrels, rabbits, wood ducks, and woodcock. The deer herd is outstanding in quality, with many trophy bucks taken by hunters. Trapping for furbearing animals is permitted. The species caught are beaver, raccoon, mink, bobcat, otter and opossum. Hawks, owls, woodpeckers and neo-tropical migrants are very prevalent on the area.
No camping is allowed by the landowner. Non-consumptive activities include nature walks and nature studies by various civic organizations, schools and the public.
Self-clearing permits are required for all activities on the area. Additional information may be obtained from Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 5652 Hwy 182, Opelousas, Louisiana, 70570. Telephone 337-948-0255.

Dewey Wills

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
61,871 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 487-5885

Dewey Wills Wildlife Management Areas is located in the southern portion of LaSalle and Catahoula Parishes in Central Louisiana approximately 20 miles northeast of Alexandria. The area is easily accessible from the large metropolitan areas via Louisiana Highway 28 . The interior contains a network of all-weather roads providing vehicular access.

Dewey Wills Wildlife Management Area is composed of approximately 61,871 acres and is owned by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries and is managed to provide wildlife habitat and outdoor recreation.

The area is flat, poorly drained land that is subject to annual overflow. This tract is interlaced with a large number of bayous and lakes.

The forest cover is a mixture of bottomland hardwoods. The major overstory species are overcup oak, bitter pecan, nuttall oak, ash, elm, and willow oak. The understory of the flats or lower elevations is composed mainly of swamp-privet, reproduction of the overstory, and native grasses and forbs. On the higher elevations the understory is composed of deciduous holly, hawthorn, smilax, swamp dogwood, peppervine, rattan vine, dewberry, blackberry, palmetto, and reproduction of the overstory.

The timber was harvested prior to Department ownership, creating an open canopy, and the removal of livestock competition was all that was necessary to stimulate understory production. At present, the forest canopy has closed and browse plants have been reduced. In recent years a very serious combination of conditions known as Oak Decline has developed on the area. As a result large numbers of trees have died. The timber management program, including harvests, has been modified to counteract this threat.

Game species hunted are deer, squirrels, rabbits, raccoon, turkey and waterfowl. Each year the area produces trophy sized bucks.  Trapping for furbearers is allowed and the species available include raccoon, nutria, beaver, mink, bobcat, fox and coyotes.

A tremendous variety of non-game bird species are present on the area. Neo-tropical nesters, shorebirds, wading birds, and various raptors are among the birds that can be found on the WMA.

The area affords excellent sport and commercial fishing. Species caught include black bass, white bass, crappie, catfish, bluegill, and other species of sunfish. Commercial species present include buffalo, carp, drum, gar, and catfish.

The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries has constructed and maintains four camping areas, five concrete boat ramps, and three stone covered boat ramps. The camping areas offer primitive camping only.

A nature trail is located on the northern end of the area.

Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 1995 Shreveport Highway, Pineville, LA 71360. Phone (318) 487-5885.

Tunica Hills WMA

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
5,906 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(985) 543-4777
Map: 

Tunica Hills Wildlife Management Area (WMA) is composed of two separate tracts lying northwest of St. Francisville in West Feliciana Parish.  The North Tract (2,346 acres) lies immediately adjacent to the Louisiana State Penitentiary. This tract is accessed from Farrah Davis Road off of LA 66, approximately 14.3 miles west of US 61.  A check station is located on the WMA approximately three miles down Farrah Davis Road from LA 66.  The South Tract (3,560 acres) has a few different access points, but is most commonly accessed by driving 17.3 miles west on LA 66 from US 61 to Old Tunica Road.  Continue on Old Tunica Road for about one mile to enter the WMA.  The Old Tunica Road is a portion of the scenic Natchez Trace System and has been used for travel since colonial times.  Three check stations are located on the South Tract.
Tunica Hills WMA encompasses 5,906 acres and is owned by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.  Terrain on the area is characterized by rugged hills, bluffs, and ravines. The area lies at the southern end of the “loess blufflands” escarpment that follows the east bank of the Mississippi River south from its confluence with the Ohio River. These blufflands offer a diverse and unique habitat that supports some species of plants and animals not found elsewhere in Louisiana.
The forest type on the area is classified as upland hardwood, with some loblolly pine and eastern red cedar mixed in on the ridge tops and creek terraces. Hardwoods consist of American beech, American holly, flowering magnolia, cherrybark oak, water oak, cow oak, hickory, sweetgum, Osage orange, hackberry, eastern hophornbeam, ironwood, yellow poplar, elm, maple, and other less predominant species. The understory varies from dense in younger areas of timber to fairly open in older areas. Common understory species are oak leaf hydrangia, two-winged silverbell, trifoliate orange, pawpaw, flowering dogwood, sweetleaf, spicebush, blackberry, and switchcane. At least 20 species of plants classified as rare in Louisiana are found on this area and two of these species have not been found to occur anywhere else in the state.
Tunica Hills WMA is open to a variety of outdoor recreational activities, including hunting, trapping, birdwatching, hiking, horseback riding, bike riding, sightseeing, and photography. A nature trail and three hiking trails are present. Hunting is allowed at specified times for deer, turkey, and small game. Trapping is allowed for coyote, fox, bobcat, raccoon and opossum. Eastern chipmunks are found on the area. Infrequently, black bear tracks are observed. Numerous snake species are common in the area, including canebrake rattlesnakes and copperheads.  Resident and migratory bird species are abundant on the area, including several that are rare elsewhere in the state, such as the worm-eating warbler and the Coopers hawk.  A tent-only camping area is located off of Parker Road on the South Tract.  Access to both tracts is provided by a series of trails. All-Terrain-Vehicles are only allowed on designated ATV trails from September through February.
Additional information can be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Wildlife Division, 42371 Phyllis Ann Rd, Hammond, LA 70403, 985-543-4777.

Union WMA

Information
Owned: 
Plum Creek Timber Corp.
Acreage: 
11,192 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 371-3050
Map: 

Union Wildlife Management area is located in Union Parish, approximately four miles west of Marion. Access is by Louisiana Highways 549 and 551, plus Concord Road. Union is 11,192 acres in size and is leased from Plum Creek Timber Company. Topography of the area is primarily rolling hills interlaced with several creeks and intermittent streams. Major creeks are Big Cane, Tick, and Meridian. Elevations range from 110 to 240 feet above mean sea level.
The forest cover is dominated by loblolly pine mixed, in some stands, with southern red oak, white oak, hickory, post oak, sweetgum, shortleaf pine, elm, and blackgum. Cherrybark oak, Arkansas oak, cow oak, and red maple are present. Beech and water oak occur, especially along the streams.
Crown closure varies with the age of managed pine timber stands, much of the area having a brushy understory. Common woody understory plants include American beautyberry, Japanese honeysuckle, yellow jessamine, greenbrier, sumac, American holly, flowering dogwood, hawthorn, persimmon, grape, arrowwood, huckleberry, salt bush, black cherry, American elder, blackberry, and poison ivy.
Game species available for hunting include deer, squirrel, rabbit, quail, dove, woodcock, and to a limited extent, waterfowl. A liberal either-sex deer season has been conducted for the past 35 years with excellent results. A lottery hunt for wild turkey is held annually. Trapping is permitted for raccoon, opossum, fox, mink, beaver, coyote, and bobcat.
A primitive camping area is provided on the east side of the WMA.
Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries, 368 CenturyTel Drive, Monroe, Louisiana 71203. Phone (318) 343-4044.

Walnut Hill WMA

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
595 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 491-2599

Walnut Hill Wildlife Management Area is a 595 acre tract of land acquired from the Farmers Home Administration. The property is located in Vernon Parish approximately 2 mile east of Slagle, La. on highway 121. The property is made up of several small tracts of land both north and south of highway 121.
This land was used primarily as pasture for dairy cattle and consists of slightly rolling hills. The habitat consists of thick under growth and mixed young hardwoods and pine trees.
The area offers limited rabbit, deer and quail hunting opportunities, due to the small acreage and thick habitat conditions presently found on the area.
Additional information and maps can be obtained from the Lake Charles Office at 1213 North Lakeshore Drive, Lake Charles, La. 70601 or phone 337/491-2575.

West Bay WMA

Information
Owned: 
Forest Capital Partners LLC., Roy O. Martin, FI
Acreage: 
56,000 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(337) 491-2575
Map: 

West Bay Wildlife Management Area is located in north-central Allen Parish near Elizabeth. State highways and parish roads leading to the area accompanied with timber company roads make West Bay very accessible. The majority of the area boundaries are as follows: south of Louisiana Highway 10, north of Louisiana Highway 26, east of Turner Road, and west of River Road. West Bay is 56,000 acres in size and is entirely privately owned. The lease, which is obtained from timber companies and private individuals without charge to the State, gives the Department the right only to manage wildlife. The terrain is generally flat. Approximately one-third of the area can be considered a baygall habitat and is poorly drained. The remaining area has fairly good drainage. The only major flowing stream is Mill Creek. The forest cover is composed of pine plantations with scattered hardwoods along streambeds. There are some pine-hardwood stands located on the edge of the baygall areas. The most common hardwood species are water oak, white oak, red oak, willow oak, cow oak, blackgum, beech, hickory. Flowering dogwood, redbay, sweetleaf, and sweetgum are important overstory species found on the area. The understory composition varies with the timber type. In the baygall portions, some of the more common and valuable species found are yaupon, rattan, arrowwood, smilax, and deciduous holly. The understory in the pine plantations is primarily blackberry, dewberry, huckleberry, smilax, and numerous annual legumes and grasses. Game species hunted on the area are squirrel, rabbit, deer, dove, woodcock, and turkey. The area offers excellent bow hunting opportunities for deer. Furbearer trapping is allowed during trapping season. Two primitive camping areas are maintained on the area. Self-clearing permits are required to access West Bay. Eight permit stations are located around the WMA. Additional information and maps may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 1213 North Lakeshore Drive, Lake Charles, Louisiana, 70601. Phone (337) 491-2575.

L.W.F.C. ADOPTS AMENDMENTS TO 2010-12 HUNTING SEASONS, 2010-11 W.M.A. RULES, NOTICES OF INTENT

Release Date: 03/04/2010

The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission (LWFC) adopted several amendments to the notices of intent for the 2010-12 hunting seasons and the 2010-11 Wildlife Management Areas (WMA) General Rules and Regulations at their March 4 meeting.

Those amendments include:

-- Alternative deer season hunting dates in Areas 1 and 6 for 2010-2011 Hunting Seasons. Proposed for:

Area 1
Archery:  Oct. 1 - Oct. 31 (Bucks Only) and Nov. 1 - Feb.15 (Either-Sex)
Primitive: Nov. 13 - Nov. 19
Still Hunt: Nov. 20 - Dec. 3
CLOSED: Dec. 4 - Dec. 10
With or Without Dogs: Dec. 11 - Jan. 2
Still Hunt: Jan. 3 - Jan. 31
Primitive: Feb. 1 - Feb. 7 and Feb. 11 - Feb. 13

 

Area 6

Archery:  Oct. 1 - Oct. 31 (Bucks Only) and Nov. 1 - Feb.15 (Either-Sex)
Primitive: Nov. 13 - Nov. 19
Still Hunt: Nov. 20 - Dec. 3
CLOSED: Dec. 4 - Dec. 10
With or Without Dogs: Dec.11 - Jan. 23
Still Hunt: Jan. 24 - Jan. 31
Primitive: Feb. 1 - Feb. 7 and Feb.11 - Feb.13

-- Changes to 2010 WMA Hunting Schedule for: Pointe-Aux-Chenes Point Farm Unit (non-toxic shot only to be used for dove season, south of the dove field gate); Sabine (feral hogs may be taken with dogs Feb. 1 to last day of Feb. only by permit available from a Region Office); and Red River Yakey Tract (recreational crawfishing allowed March 15 - July 31). 

-- Seasonal changes for Kisatchie National Forest for 2010-2011 (minor changes for small game, waterfowl and nuisance species harvest) and user rules; deer season dates to be presented separately at April LWFC meeting.

-- Changes to WMA Hunting Regulations relative to feral hogs (adds Attakapas and Pass-a-Loutre WMAs to list of WMAs allowing hunters to use dogs to hunt hogs; live hogs can only be transported with permit available at LDWF field offices); and blood tracking dogs (leashed dogs would be allowed by still hunters to trail and retrieve wounded or unrecovered deer).

To view the original notices of intent and amendments for proposed hunting season dates for the upcoming hunting season, please visit www.wlf.louisiana.gov/education/commissionactions.

Public comment can be submitted to Randy Myers, Wildlife Division, LDWF, PO Box 98000, Baton Rouge, LA 70898-9000 until May 6.

The public meeting schedule for the proposed 2010-11 hunting season is as follows:

-- March 9 at 6 p.m. in the cafeteria of the Hammond High School located at 45168 River Road.
-- March 9 at 6 p.m. at the Ruston Civic Center located at N. Trenton St.
-- March 10 at 6 p.m. at the Alexandria Convention Hall located at 915 Third St.
-- March 11 at 6:30 p.m. at the LDWF Office in Minden located at 9961 Hwy. 80.
-- March 16 at 6:30 p.m. at the LSU AgCenter next to Burton Coliseum in Lake Charles.
-- March 18 at 6 p.m. in room 119 of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service building located at 646 Cajundome Blvd. in Lafayette.

For more information, contact Randy Myers at 225-765-2359 or rmyers@wlf.la.gov.    

2010-081

September 2007 Survey

Survey Type: 
Month/Year Surveys
Documents: 

January 2007 Survey

Survey Type: 
Month/Year Surveys
Documents: 
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