Wildlife

Tangipahoa Parish School Board WMA

Acreage

1,643

Contact

fburks@wlf.la.gov; 985-543-4781; 42371 Phyllis Ann Dr, Hammond, LA 70403

Parish

Tangipahoa

Owner/manager

LDWF leases the property from Tangipahoa Parish School Board

Description

LDWF has leased small, scattered tracts of land that make up this WMA from the Tangipahoa Parish School Board since April 2003. The intent of both parties is to better manage wildlife and ensure continued public access to this land.

The first tract is located in the center of Tangipahoa Parish, south of LA Hwy 16; it contains 347 acres of upland pine habitat actively managed for loblolly pine timber production. There are timber stands of various ages with scattered hardwoods. The second tract is also found south of LA Hwy 16. This 649-acre tract is bordered on the east by Hillcrest School Road. Habitats include longleaf and loblolly pine and mixed pine/hardwoods. The third tract is located north of LA Hwy 38, near Lewiston. It contains 647 acres of longleaf and loblolly pine and mixed pine/hardwoods.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Available game species include white-tailed deer, turkey, squirrel, rabbit, mourning dove, bobwhite quail, and woodcock. See regulations for details.

Other: hiking, photography, birding

Directions

Access the first tract via Neal Road west of Briar Patch Road and LA Hwy 445. Head south on Dummyline Road at Sharon M.B. Church to access the second tract. Access the third tract via Brumfield Lane. You must have a self-clearing permit to access any of these tracts.

Thistlethwaite WMA

Acreage

11,100

Contact

jhaynes@wlf.la.gov; 337-948-0255; 5652 Hwy 182, Opelousas, LA 70570

Parish

St. Landry

Owner/manager

Thistlethwaite Heirs

Description

The terrain on Thistlethwaite WMA is generally flat bottomland, with a gentle north-south slope. Drainage is slow, with standing water after heavy rains. Forest cover is predominantly water, willow, overcup, white, cherrybark, nuttall, cow, and post oak. Other species are bitter and sweet pecan, hickory, hackberry, sweetgum, ash, elm, and maple. The lower areas contain cypress and tupelo gum. There is a dense understory of palmetto in many areas of the WMA. Selective timber harvesting has enhanced browse species such as dogwood, redbud, elderberry, French mulberry, greenbrier, rattan, and blackberry.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Available game species include deer, squirrel, rabbit, wood duck, and woodcock. The deer herd is high-quality—hunters take many trophy bucks on this WMA. There is a youth deer season. Trapping for furbearers is permitted; species include beaver, raccoon, mink, bobcat, otter, and opossum. See regulations for details.

Birding: Hawks, owls, woodpeckers, and neotropical migrant songbirds are common on Thistlethwaite WMA.

Hiking: LDWF maintains approximately 1 mile of wooded trails on the WMA.

Directions

Thistlethwaite WMA is located immediately northeast of Washington off LA Hwy 10. You can also access the WMA via I-49 at the Lebeau exit. LDWF maintains 17 miles of improved roads on the WMA. You must have a self-clearing permit for any activity on the WMA.

Tunica Hills WMA

Acreage

6,503

Contact

fburks@wlf.la.gov; 985-543-4781; 42371 Phyllis Ann Dr, Hammond, LA 70403

Parish

West Feliciana

Owner/manager

LDWF, Louisiana Office of State Parks

Description

Tunica Hills WMA is composed of two separate tracts. The North Tract (2,346 acres) is immediately adjacent to the Louisiana State Penitentiary. The South Tract (4,156 acres) is off Old Tunica Road, which is part of the scenic Natchez Trace System and has been used for travel since colonial times.

The WMA’s terrain is characterized by rugged hills, bluffs, and ravines. The area lies at the southern end of the “loess blufflands” escarpment that follows the east bank of the Mississippi River south from its confluence with the Ohio River. These blufflands offer a diverse and unique habitat that supports some species of plants and animals not found elsewhere in Louisiana.

The forest on the area is classified as upland hardwood, with some loblolly pine and eastern red cedar mixed in on the ridge tops and creek terraces. Hardwoods include American beech; American holly; flowering magnolia; cherrybark, water, and cow oak; hickory; sweetgum; Osage orange; hackberry; eastern hophornbeam; ironwood; yellow poplar; elm; and maple. The understory varies from dense in younger areas of timber to fairly open in older areas. Common understory species are oak leaf hydrangea, two-winged silverbell, trifoliate orange, pawpaw, flowering dogwood, sweetleaf, spicebush, blackberry, and switchcane. At least 20 species of plants classified as rare in Louisiana are found on this area; two of these species have not been found anywhere else in the state.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Hunting is allowed at specified times for deer, turkey, and small game. There are youth and general turkey lottery hunts and a youth deer season. Trapping is allowed for coyote, fox, bobcat, raccoon, and opossum. See regulations for details.

Birding and wildlife viewing: Tunica Hills WMA is home to several resident and migratory bird species including some that are rare elsewhere in the state, such as the worm-eating warbler and the Coopers hawk. There are eastern chipmunks and numerous snake species, including canebrake rattlesnakes and copperheads. Black bear tracks are observed occasionally.

Camping: There is a tent-only, primitive camping area off of Parker Road on the South Tract.

Hiking: There is a nature trail and three hiking trails on Tunica Hills WMA.

Other: horseback riding, biking, photography

Directions

Tunica Hills WMA is northwest of St. Francisville. Access the North Tract from Farrah Davis Road off LA Hwy 66, approximately 14.3 miles west of U.S. Hwy 61. While you can access the South Tract from a few different points, the best way to go is by driving 17.3 miles west on LA Hwy 66 from U.S. Hwy 61 to Old Tunica Road. Continue on Old Tunica Road for about 1 mile to enter the WMA. A series of trails provide interior access to both tracts.

Walnut Hill WMA

Acreage

595

Contact

wsmith@wlf.la.gov; 337-491-2575; 1213 North Lakeshore Dr, Lake Charles, LA 70601

Parish

Vernon

Owner

LDWF

Description

LDWF acquired Walnut Hill WMA from the Farmers Home Administration. The property is made up of several small tracts of land both north and south of Hwy 121. This land consists of slightly rolling hills and was primarily used as pasture for dairy cattle. The habitat includes thick undergrowth and mixed young hardwoods and pine trees.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: There are limited rabbit, deer (archery only), and quail hunting opportunities on Walnut Hill WMA due to its small size and dense habitat. There is a small game emphasis area on this WMA. See regulations for details.

Other: hiking, photography, birding

Directions

Walnut Hill WMA is located approximately 2 miles east of Slagle on Hwy 121.

January 2010 Survey

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January 2009 Survey

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November 2008 Survey

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