L.D.W.F. News

L.D.W.F. News Release

L.D.W.F. Agents Find Body of Missing Man in Vermilion River

Release Date: 03/10/2011

March 10, 2011 - Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Enforcement Division agents found the body of a missing man in the Vermilion River in Lafayette at 10:15 a.m. on March 10.

Senior Agent Nick Guillory, Agent Jake Darden and Agent Justin Lowry were on patrol when they located the deceased body of Mitch Jackson, 39, of Rayne, in the Vermilion River behind 200 Farmington Road in Lafayette.

Jackson had been missing since Friday, March 4 after he was involved in a five-car accident on Ambassador Caffery Parkway in Lafayette and left the scene. He then drove his vehicle to the local Home Depot and locked the vehicle with his cell phone and medications for high blood pressure inside.

He was last seen on surveillance video entering and leaving a few stores on Ambassador Caffery Parkway before disappearing.

After locating the body, LDWF agents contacted the Lafayette Parish Sheriff's Office (LPSO) and Lafayette Police Department (LPD), who then arrived on scene to recover the body and conduct an investigation. Jackson's body is now at the Lafayette Coroner's Office.  An official cause of death is not available at this time.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

Dewey Wills W.M.A. Road Closure

Release Date: 03/10/2011

March 10, 2011 - A portion of Muddy Bayou Road from Saline Bayou, eastward to Nolan Bayou Road, has been temporarily closed to automobile traffic on the Dewey Wills Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in LaSalle Parish, effective March 9. The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) closed that section of road due to high water from recent rainfall.

The road will be reopened when water recedes and the roadway dries sufficiently to allow for vehicular traffic.

The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana's abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.louisiana.gov on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb or follow us on Twitter @LDWF.

For more information on the road closure, contact Steve Smith at 318-487-5885 or ssmith@wlf.la.gov.  

L.D.W.F. Agents Rescue 32 People in Tangipahoa Parish

Release Date: 03/09/2011

March 9, 2011 - Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) Enforcement Division agents rescued 32 people on March 8 in Tangipahoa Parish from flooding conditions due to severe rainfall.

LDWF agents responded to a call around 7 p.m. of a vehicle that got swept off of Lewiston Road east of Kentwood into Big Creek. Sgt. Toby Miller and Senior Agent Brody Roberts launched a shallow drive vessel into the creek and were able to pull a female and her young daughter from the rooftop of the vehicle. Agents reported there was only about 6 inches of the vehicle above the water when the rescue was made.

LDWF agents then received a call around 8 p.m. from the Kentwood Fire Department of two trailer parks that flooded in Tangipahoa. By 12:30 a.m. on March 9, Sgt. Miller, Senior Agent Roberts and Sgt. Darryl Galloway were able to rescue 30 people from the two trailer parks again using a shallow draft vessel. Agents reported the water was above the skirting of the trailers. Agents also rescued two dogs and two horses.

Agents brought the rescued people to Hwy. 51 where emergency personnel from Acadian Ambulance, Tangipahoa Sheriff's Office, Tangipahoa Police Department and the Kentwood Fire Department were on standby. Emergency personnel then transported the rescued people to a shelter in Kentwood. Between all of the emergency personnel that responded, over 100 people were rescued from trailer parks and roadways on the night of March 8.

"These three agents responded in a very quick and efficient manner, which is required for any search and rescue mission," said Col. Winton Vidrine, head of the LDWF Enforcement Division. "Enforcement agents are well equipped and trained for search and rescue missions as they have the trucks and vessels to get to remote areas that flood and have numerous hours of swift water and first aid training."

LDWF agents will remain on standby statewide and also assist with local emergency responders as severe weather is expected to continue throughout the day.

The LDWF Enforcement Division is the primary agency for search and rescue in the state and the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness (GOHSEP) designated lead for search and rescue operations. LDWF agents have several decades of experience in boating safety enforcement, maritime patrol enforcement and maritime search and rescue.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at 225-765-2465 or aeinck@wlf.la.gov.

Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission and NOAA Begin Regional Survey of the Economic Contributions of Saltwater Angling

Release Date: 03/09/2011

March 7, 2011 - The Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission (GSMFC) and NOAA are surveying saltwater anglers across the Gulf of Mexico to update and improve estimates of the overall economic contributions of saltwater recreational fishing to the Gulf and U.S. economy. This study is part of the 2011 National Marine Recreational Fishing Expenditure Survey.

“This is the kind of new and enhanced information that will help several levels of recreational fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico,” said Larry Simpson, GSMFC Executive Director.

NOAA, GSMFC, and the saltwater angling community need timely economic data to help evaluate the economic importance of recreational fishing activities. The data will give a more updated look at the economic effects of fishing regulations and changes in the ecosystem caused by natural or manmade events such as the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster. The information gathered in the survey will contribute to more informed decisions on a variety of recreational fishing issues.

NOAA and the GSMFC will survey a random sampling of the approximately 3 million saltwater anglers in the five Gulf states and Puerto Rico. The survey will include a random sampling of people who fish from shore, docks, party or charter boats and privately owned boats. Surveying began in January and will continue throughout the year in Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Puerto Rico. It will begin in Texas in March and April. This is NOAA’s and GSMFC’s second survey focusing on how much saltwater anglers spend on their sport throughout the Gulf region.

GSMFC and its state partners will ask anglers how long their fishing trips last and how much they spend on bait, boat fuel, ice, charter fees and other expenses. Anglers will also be asked to participate in a follow-up survey that will ask them to estimate what they spent on durable goods such as boats and fishing tackle used for saltwater angling for the previous 12 months. Those who participate in both parts of the survey will help NOAA and GSMFC produce accurate economic information.

Economists from NOAA’s Fisheries Service and the GSMFC as well as state partners are assisting with the 2011 survey. Once the economic data are collected, they will be analyzed and released as a NOAA report. The most recent economic study in 2008 showed that anglers’ expenditures generated more than $12 billion in sales and supported more than 113,000 jobs throughout the Gulf region.

The GSMFC’s principal objectives include the conservation, development, and full utilization of the fishery resources of the Gulf of Mexico in order to provide food, employment, income, and recreation to the people of these United States.

CONTACT: Alex Miller
GSMFC Economist 
228.875.5912
amiller@gsmfc.org 
Sabrina Lovell
NOAA Economist
301.713.2328 x101
2011NES@noaa.gov

L.D.W.F. Opens New Air Gun Range at Waddill Outdoor Education Center in Baton Rouge

Release Date: 03/04/2011

The new Waddill Outdoor Education Center air gun range provides 12 shooting stations under a covered firing line.
Targets at the Waddill Outdoor Education Center air gun range are staged at 10 and 20-meters distances.
LDWF Secretary Robert Barham and NWTF Regional Biologist Luke Lewis at Waddill O.E.C. air gun range ribbon cutting

March 4, 2011 – The public now has access to a new air gun shooting range at the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries’ (LDWF) Waddill Outdoor Education Center in Baton Rouge. Ribbon cutting ceremonies were held Feb. 25 at the site.

“This project is a wonderful example of a cooperative partnership involving the National Wild Turkey Federation’s Louisiana Chapter and the department,” said LDWF Secretary Robert Barham. “This is where the education process begins for young hunters or those who want to become competitive shooters.”

Range construction was funded by a $5,000 donation from NWTF’s La. Chapter that was matched with LDWF Hunter Education funds. The site provides 12 shooting stations with a covered firing line that is handicap-user accessible. The range, which can be used for air rifle, air pistol and BB gun target shooting, offers 12 targets at 10 meters and four targets at 20 meters, and was designed for use in official competitions.

This new air gun range adds to the outdoor activities available at Waddill that include fishing ponds, an archery range, field archery trail, walking trails and picnicking areas. The on site education center is also used for hunter education classes.

Those attending the Feb. 25 gun range ribbon cutting were also able to view a new footbridge providing easier access to the archery range. A senior project completed by Baton Rouge Magnet High School student John Parham Murrill, the bridge fulfills the student’s goal of giving back to the community.

The Waddill Outdoor Education Center is located at 4142 North Flannery Road and is open to the public Tuesday through Saturday from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Access to the site, including the new shooting range, is free of charge.

The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana's abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.louisiana.gov on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb or follow us on Twitter @LDWF.

For more information on the programs and facilities available at Waddill, contact Wayne Huston at 225-274-8192 whuston@wlf.la.gov.

For video of the new air rifle range dedication ceremony, please visit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBolzuavH_8

or click the following link:

Louisiana and Texas Establish Consistent Regulations for Recreational Fishing on Shared Waters

Release Date: 03/04/2011

Changes to become effective September 1, 2011

March 4, 2011 - In a historic move, Louisiana and Texas will soon adopt consistent recreational fishing regulations governing their bordering waters. Biologists from the two states have agreed upon regulations that are biologically sound and consistent on both sides of the boundary.

“This monumental event results from cooperation between the two states along with the support of state Rep. James Armes,” said Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Assistant Secretary Randy Pausina. “Our department is committed to working with our state partners to provide a better fishing experience for Louisiana anglers.”

The two states share waters along most of their common border, supporting excellent recreational fisheries and attracting thousands of anglers each year. The line between the two states follows the Old Sabine River down through the middle of Toledo Bend, so anglers currently must abide by two sets of laws.

The potential for error for even the most conscientious angler is extremely high. For example, an angler with a legal fish in Louisiana can simply drift over the state line into Texas waters and be in violation of their regulations. Unfortunately, many anglers have been cited because of the unnecessary confusion.

The Texas Wildlife Commission has approved a Notice of Intent to make necessary changes on their end. The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission has now given official notice they intend to make the necessary changes for Louisiana.

Anglers are encouraged to provide their input regarding the changes. Louisiana public hearings will be scheduled in the Minden, Many and Lake Charles areas. Meeting dates and specific locations are being finalized and will be released soon.

With positive public approval and passage by both the Texas and Louisiana Commissions, the regulations are to be implemented on September 1, 2011.

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana's abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.louisiana.gov on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb or follow us on Twitter @LDWF.

For more information contact Ashley Wethey at awethey@wlf.la.gov (225)765-5113.

DHH to Allow Oyster Harvesting in Previously Closed Oyster Area of Calcasieu Lake

Release Date: 03/03/2011

DHH to Allow Oyster Harvesting in Previously Closed Oyster Area of Calcasieu Lake

 

Please note that the previous version of this news release omitted media contacts found below.

March 3, 2011 - Officials with the Department of Health and Hospitals and the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries signed orders this week to allow oyster harvesting in an 11,993 acre area of Calcasieu Lake, which previously had high fecal coliform counts. Recent tests conducted by DHH have shown the levels of fecal coliform are now below levels of any concern for health. The 11,993 acres is in the southern half of Calcasieu Lake and is part of oyster harvest Area 29.

LDWF Secretary Robert Barham, DHH Secretary Bruce D. Greenstein and State Health Officer Dr. Jimmy Guidry signed the order this week to allow harvesting there effective one half hour prior to official sunrise March 4.

Area 29 is a conditionally managed oyster harvest area. Conditionally managed harvest areas have a set season which runs from October 15th through April 30th. The season is set due to Calcasieu river stages.

The majority of Louisiana’s 30 oyster harvest areas are open right now. Harvest Area 8, near the mouth of the Mississippi river remains closed due to high fecal coliform levels. Area 12 is partially open as crews continue cleanup of the oil spill.

The Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals strives to protect and promote health statewide and to ensure access to medical, preventive and rehabilitative services for all state citizens. To learn more about DHH, visit http://www.dhh.louisiana.gov. For up-to-date health information, news and emergency updates, follow DHH’s blog at www.myhealthla.org, Twitter at http://twitter.com/La_Health_Dept and search for the Louisiana Department of Health and
Hospitals on Facebook.

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana's abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.louisiana.gov on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb or follow us on Twitter @LDWF.

For more information, contact Olivia Watkins, LDWF, (225) 610-8660 owatkins@wlf.la.gov or Ken Pastorick, DHH, (225) 342-1881 ken.pastorick@la.gov .

L.W.F.C. Adopts Amendment to Proposed 2011-12 Hunting Season Rules

Release Date: 03/03/2011

March 3, 2011 - The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission (LWFC) adopted an amendment to the notice of intent for the 2011-12 Hunting Seasons Rules and Regulations at their March 3 meeting.

The amendment would increase the special youth deer hunt on private lands for the 2011-12 season from two to seven days. In addition, it would amend the regulation that restricts youth hunters to use shotguns loaded with a slugs only during the primitive firearm season and allow youth hunters to use any legal weapon during the primitive firearm season. The specific amendment is as follows:

Special Youth Deer Season on Private Land
Either sex. Youths 17 years of age or younger may hunt deer with any legal weapon during the Primitive Firearms Season in each deer hunting area.

Either sex. Areas 1, 4, 5, 6: Oct. 29 - Nov. 4, 2011 and Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2012; Area 2: Oct. 8 - 14, 2011 and Oct. 13 - 19, 2012; Areas 3, 7, 8: Sept. 24 - 30, 2011 and Sept. 29 - Oct. 5, 2012.
To view the original notices of intent and amendments for proposed hunting season dates for the upcoming hunting season, please visit http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/action-items.

Public comment can be submitted to Randy Myers, Wildlife Division, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF), P.O. Box 98000, Baton Rouge, LA 70898-9000, until May 5.

The public meeting schedule for the proposed 2011-12 hunting season is as follows:

  • March 9 at 6 p.m., Alexandria Convention Hall located at 915 Third St.
  • March 15 at 6:30 p.m., LDWF Office in Minden located at 9961 Hwy. 80.
  • March 15 at 6:30 p.m., Yambilee Festival Bldg., 1939 W. Landry, Opelousas 
  • March 16 at 6 p.m., Ponchatoula High School Cafeteria, 19452 Hwy. 22. 
  • March 17 at 6 p.m., Bastrop Visitor Center, 124 N. Washington St.
  • March 22 at 6:30 p.m., LSU Ag Center, 7101 Gulf Hwy., Lake Charles.

The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana's abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.louisiana.gov on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb or follow us on Twitter @LDWF.

For more information, contact Randy Myers at 225-765-2359 or rmyers@wlf.la.gov.

LDWF Public Meetings in March Provide Hunters Opportunity to Comment on Proposed 2011-13 Hunting Seasons, WMA Rules Changes, DMAP Re-organization, Waterfowl Season Options

Release Date: 03/01/2011

March 1, 2011 - The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries will host six public meetings around the state to present proposed 2011-13 hunting season dates, Wildlife Management Areas (WMA) general rules and regulation changes, changes in the Deer Management Assistance Program (DMAP) and waterfowl season options.

Public comment will be taken on all items under consideration by the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission through May 5. The meeting dates and locations include:

  • March 9 at 6 p.m., Alexandria Convention Hall located at 915 Third St.
  • March 15 at 6:30 p.m., LDWF Office in Minden located at 9961 Hwy. 80.
  • March 15 at 6:30 p.m., Yambilee Festival Bldg., 1939 W. Landry, Opelousas
  • March 16 at 6 p.m., Ponchatoula High School Cafeteria, 19452 Hwy. 22.
  • March 17 at 6 p.m., Bastrop Visitor Center, 124 N. Washington St.
  • March 22 at 6:30 p.m., LSU Ag Center, 7101 Gulf Hwy., Lake Charles.

To view the full notice of intent and all proposed hunting season dates and regulations changes for the upcoming hunting season, please visit http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/action-items. Public comment will be accepted at LWFC monthly meetings from March through May or can be submitted directly to Randy Myers, Wildlife Division, LDWF, PO Box 98000, Baton Rouge, LA 70898-9000, until May 5.

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana's abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.louisiana.gov on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb or follow us on Twitter @LDWF.

For more information, contact Randy Myers at 225-765-2359 or rmyers@wlf.la.gov.

Governor Jindal Announces State Investing $12 Million in Emergency Restoration Funding for Louisiana Coast, Not Waiting for BP

Release Date: 03/01/2011

March 1, 2011 - Today, Governor Bobby Jindal joined coastal parish leaders and members of the fishing and oyster industries to announce $12 million in emergency restoration funding to help Louisiana’s coastline recover from the effects of the BP oil spill. This funding total includes $2 million to reestablish oyster beds in public seed grounds, $5 million for shoreline stabilization by engineered shoreline reefs, and $5 million to reestablish vegetation and sand fencing for approximately ten miles of oil-impacted shoreline. 

The Governor stressed that the state has repeatedly requested emergency restoration funding from BP to reestablish oyster beds, plant vegetation killed by oil and stabilize eroding shorelines resulting from the spill – but BP has refused to provide upfront funding for these efforts. 

Governor Jindal said, “We have met with BP on many occasions. Indeed, we have repeatedly requested emergency restoration funding from BP to reestablish oyster beds, plant vegetation killed by oil and stabilize eroding shorelines resulting from the spill. But, time and time again, BP has refused to front funding for these critical emergency restoration efforts. Today, yet again, we are here to tell BP that we need action, not talk. Just like during the response to the oil spill, when we were promised resources and assistance that always seemed to be too little, too late – today, we are again here to take our own action and not let more of our oystermen, fishermen, families, communities or businesses suffer as we wait for BP to act.

“That’s why we are announcing today that we are moving forward to immediately dedicate $12 million in funding toward emergency restoration actions to help our people and industries get back on their feet after this environmental catastrophe. We expect all $12 million to be replenished by BP as soon as they ‘make it right’ with our coastal communities by fully covering losses from this tragic spill. Today’s announcement is just the first step and much more work needs to be done by BP to ensure our coast is fully restored. I have no doubt that we will come back from the effects of this spill stronger than ever before. But, we cannot afford to wait. Our recovery demands action, and we are taking an important step toward restoring our coast today. We urge BP to follow our lead and replenish these funds as quickly as possible.”

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Secretary Robert Barham said, “For months we’ve spoken with BP about the need to invest in our recovery now, but they’ve continued to stall by only promising funds if the state will release everyone they’ve ever done business with from any kind of liability. That’s not the way to help Louisiana recover. It isn’t enough for them to spend millions of dollars on TV and radio commercials talking about doing the right thing, they must follow through. Working with the governor, we doing what BP should have done months ago; we are investing $2 million in oyster cultch now to help our Louisiana seafood industry get back to providing healthy, delicious oysters to consumers across the country. Rather than doing further damage by holding up negotiations, we want to see BP step forward and fulfill their promises to ‘make it right.’”

Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser said, “This investment in our coastal areas will go a long way in getting our coastline back to 100 percent. Even though BP and the federal government continue to drag their feet in processing claims, fighting the oil and restoring our way of life – I’m glad we have a state government that moves with a sense of urgency in providing our costal communities funding for revitalizing the coast and supporting our fishermen and oystermen.”

St. Bernard Parish President Craig P. Taffaro said, “We welcome the opportunity to partner with our state’s leadership in order to facilitate an ambitious intervention to slow the oil impacts from the BP disaster. St. Bernard Parish will continue to stand with our local and state partners at the forefront of this recovery to hold BP accountable until the cleaning and restoring of Louisiana’s coast is complete and the commercial fishing industry is protected.”

Jefferson Parish President John F. Young, Jr. said, “We expect BP to do the right thing, but we cannot wait any longer. We must take it upon ourselves to help our oyster industry, protect and restore our shoreline, and continue to work toward our overall recovery. We will take care of those who have lost the most, and we will hold BP accountable.”

Terrebonne Parish President Michel H Claudet said, “Generations upon generations of families have lived in our coastal areas and this oil spill put their futures in great danger. The effects of the oil spill are still being felt along our fragile coastal line. I urge our counterparts within the federal government to help our coastal communities rebound from this crisis. For all of our challenges, I applaud the Governor for moving dollars as quickly as possible and investing in our coastal areas so we can keep our communities thriving and vibrant."

Lafourche Parish President Charlotte Randolph said, "The oil spill happened almost a year ago, and yet our fishermen and oil and gas workers are still feeling the impacts. Fortunately today, our governor is doing what BP should have done long ago: funding the restoration of our wetlands and coastal life. These dollars are investments in our communities, and we will continue to work with the Governor to press BP to make us right."

Grand Isle Mayor David Camardelle said, “This commitment of funds by Governor Jindal will work to rebuild the habitat of our coastline and support area communities. Our coastal regions depend on what comes from these waters, so these will be well-spent funds as we all do our part in rebuilding our image and coastal economy."

Jean Lafitte Mayor Tim Kerner said, "It's no secret we haven't received the help we need for what BP did to our coast. Between the oil spill, the moratorium and the new rules for drilling, it seems like we've been under attack from all angles. I'm glad the Governor worked with his coastal and legal folks to get some of the funding we'll need to repair our wetlands and wildlife."

Louisiana Oyster Task Force Chairman Mike Voisin said, “The immediate availability of these funds are a great step forward in helping the oyster community in Louisiana recover from the challenges of last year! We appreciate and applaud the Governor in stepping forward in utilizing these funds on an expedited basis to help with this much needed recovery effort. While we appreciate the Governors efforts, we continue to encourage BP to reimburse the State for these dollars spent and put forth additional dollars to further help in this oyster rehabilitation effort.”

Louisiana State Director National Wildlife Federation David P. Muth said, “The National Wildlife Federation supports efforts to jump start restoration initiatives that directly remediate damages from the BP oil spill. Projects that can begin in the near-term to stabilize damaged marsh shoreline along eroding bay edges, or protect islands where pelicans, roseate spoonbills and other water-birds nest, will help to offset the damage from the spill. We encourage the use of innovative natural techniques for shoreline protection, such as establishment of oyster reefs in the intertidal zone. Such techniques will prove more sustainable and cost effective than traditional methods, and should provide greatly enhanced ecosystem services. Long term monitoring and damage assessment are important tools for evaluating the effects of the spill and near-term remediation should not interfere with the process. But in areas where damage is acute and where valuable resources face imminent loss due to erosion, immediate protection and remediation may be warranted.”

The $2 million for oyster beds will come from funds in the Oyster Seed Ground Development Account. This is a Department of Wildlife and Fisheries account funded through compensation for impacts to public oyster seed grounds. This oyster seeding will include placing nearly 37,000 tons of cultch material to establish up to 200 acres of oyster beds on public seed grounds.

The $5 million for engineered shoreline reefs is from the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority’s Emergency Reserve Account. More than 317 miles of Louisiana’s coastline is still impacted by oil and this $5 million in funding will enable the state to take immediate action to construct shoreline reefs that will help restore and protect the state’s coast as it recovers from oil spill damage.

With this funding, up to three miles of engineered shoreline reefs and other protective measures will be placed along the coast to stabilize the effects of the oil spill. Engineered shoreline reefs are similar to oyster seeding, because they are shaped to allow oysters to form on them and reproduce. They also serve to break waves and improve water quality, as oysters clean the water around them.

The $5 million for reestablishing vegetation and shoreline restoration comes from the Coastal Impact Assistance Program (CIAP). Funding is currently sitting in this program for projects that are stalled with federal studies, and the state will free up $5 million from the fund to reestablish vegetation and sand fencing over approximately 30 miles of coastal shoreline where oil has killed coastal plants and root systems that hold Louisiana’s coast together. 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana's abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.louisiana.gov on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ldwffb or follow us on Twitter @LDWF.

Governor's Press Office: Melissa Sellers, Kyle Plotkin
Contact: 225-342-8006, (c) 225-328-3755

Contact Olivia Watkins, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheres, at owatkins@wlf.la.gov (225) 765-2396.   

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