LDWF News

LDWF News Release

Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge Temporary Closure Notification

Release Date: 08/23/2010

 

Beginning Sept.1, 2010, Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge will be closed each morning until 10 a.m. through Sept. 7 for the 2010 refuge alligator harvest.

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) refuge in Cameron and Vermilion parishes conducts the annual harvest to remove alligators from public use areas on site. Once the site is open at 10 a.m., fishermen and other site visitors can enter the refuge, but are instructed not to disturb lines set by licensed alligator trappers.

All other refuge regulations will remain in effect during the temporary closure period. For more information on Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge, visit the LDWF website at www.wlf.la.gov.

For more information, contact Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge headquarters at 337-491-2593 or 337-538-2276.

2010-252

Fish Kill in MRGO Tied to Low Oxygen Levels

Release Date: 08/23/2010

 

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) biologists investigating a fish kill in the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet (MRGO) found low oxygen levels to blame.  LDWF received several reports on Sunday, August 22 concerning a large fish kill around the MRGO, east of Hopedale. 

LDWF biologists have confirmed the kill is a result of natural events and is not associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.  High nutrient content from the Mississippi River in combination with seasonal occurrences has been the cause of hypoxic conditions for years.  Although essential in fertilizing the estuaries, in some cases the nutrient load is too great and hypoxic conditions arise.   Hypoxic events typically occur in late summer to fall and are also associated with processes that bring deep low-oxygen water to the surface. 

Fish need an oxygen level of at least three parts per million to survive.  Measurements taken by LDWF staff at various samples sites showed less than one part per million of oxygen at the bottom of the water. A "borderline" oxygen level of perhaps three parts per million was found at the top.

The only large concentration of dead fish was noted in a bayou immediately adjacent to the MRGO.  An estimated 500 fish were found in the area. Based on the condition of the fish, they appeared to be roughly five days old.  Species observed included large red drum, sheepshead, hardhead catfish, spotted sea trout, croakers and stingray.

Seasonal fish kills are normally found in much of southern Louisiana associated with low oxygen events.  LDWF biologists expect these to be common in areas such as marinas, dead-end canals, and other areas with poor circulation.  LDWF investigates fish kills using long-standing protocols based on the available information. 

To report a fish kill or abnormality, contact the nearest LDWF office during business hours or the Operation Game Thief operator (1-800-442-2511) after hours.

Coastal area offices are listed below:

Slidell
61384 Fish Hatchery Road
Lacombe, LA 70461
Phone (985) 882-0027

New Orleans
2021 Lakeshore Drive, Suite 407
New Orleans, LA 70122
Phone (504) 284-2030

Bourg
Post Office Box 189
Bourg, LA 70343
Phone (985) 594-4139

New Iberia
2415 Darnall Road
New Iberia, LA 70560
Phone (337) 373-0032

 Lake Charles
1213 North Lakeshore Drive
Lake Charles, LA 70601
Phone (337) 491-2579

For more information contact Ashley Wethey at awethey@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-5113.

2010-254

L.D.W.F. Announces Significant Reopenings to Commercial Crabbing in Plaquemines, St. Bernard and Orleans Parishes

Release Date: 08/20/2010

 

Today, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, in coordination with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, has ordered an emergency reopening of commercial crabbing in areas east of the Mississippi River and the northern shore of Pass a Loutre that were previously closed due to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Effective immediately today, August 21, all state inside and outside territorial waters east of the Mississippi River and north of the northern shore of Pass a Loutre and 29 degrees 12 minutes 40 seconds north latitude are open to the commercial harvest of crabs

LDWF Secretary Robert Barham ordered these reopenings following the completion of comprehensive testing by the FDA. The FDA advised that following extensive sensory testing and analytical chemistry results, the crab samples tested from previously closed areas are safe for consumption.

The following areas remain closed to all commercial fishing including commercial crabbing until further notice:

the portion of state inside and outside waters north of 29 degrees 59 minutes 30 seconds north latitude and south of the Mississippi/Louisiana state line from the Louisiana territorial sea boundary westward to 89 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds west longitude, and 
the portion of state inside and outside waters north of 29 degrees 36 minutes 30 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 59 minutes 30 seconds north latitude from the Louisiana territorial sea boundary westward to a line extending 1 mile west from the western shore of the Chandeleur Islands, and 
the portion of state inside waters north of 29 degrees 45 minutes 00 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 59 minutes 30 seconds north latitude from 89 degrees 09 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to 89 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds west longitude, and 
the portion of state inside waters north of 29 degrees 47 minutes 00 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 51 minutes 00 seconds north latitude from 89 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to 89 degrees 22 minutes 00 seconds west longitude. 
All Louisiana commercial fishing closures as detailed on the commercial fishing maps posted to the LDWF website remain unchanged.

For more information contact Marianne Burke, 225-765-2917 or mburke@wlf.la.gov

For more information related to the oil spill, visit http://www.emergency.louisiana.gov. Connect with us on Facebook athttp://www.facebook.com/GOHSEP and on Twitter as @GOHSEP. View photos from the state's response efforts athttp://www.flickr.com/photos/lagohsep.

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L.D.W.F. Reopens All State Waters to Recreational Angling

Release Date: 08/19/2010

Today, the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission ordered an immediate opening of all state inshore and offshore territorial waters to recreational angling, including charter boat angling.  The areas opened today by the commission do not include the recreational harvest of shrimp, crabs or oysters.  Prior to today?s action, approximately 862 square miles or 11 percent of saltwater areas of the state remained closed to all recreational fishing due to the impacts from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. 

LDWF, in coordination with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, is continuing to provide additional fish tissue samples for sensory testing and chemical analysis in preparation for re-opening areas currently closed to commercial crabbing and commercial fishing.

With today?s action, the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission also voted to submit a letter, urging the FDA and NOAA to expedite the required testing to re-open commercial fishing areas previously closed due to confirmed reports of oil.

LDWF guidelines for re-opening commercial fishing areas are as follows:

Once visible signs of oil are no longer apparent in areas that were previously closed by LDWF to commercial fishing, LDWF will then submit an ?intent to reopen? to NOAA and the FDA

LDWF biologists will conduct thorough sampling of finfish, crabs and shrimp in the proposed reopening area

Following the collection of the samples, biologists will immediately transfer specimens to be tested by the FDA and NOAA for signs of chemical contamination.  This process is expected to take between seven and ten days

After complete analysis the FDA and NOAA will render an opinion regarding proposed reopening

For a map detailing today?s recreational openings click here. 

For more information, contact Laura Deslatte at ldeslatte@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2335

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LDWF Announces the Opening of Commercial Crab Fishing in Significant Areas West of the Mississippi River

Release Date: 08/19/2010

 

Today, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, in coordination with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, ordered an emergency reopening of commercial crabbing in areas west of Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River that were previously closed because of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Effective immediately today, August 20, all state inside and outside territorial waters west of Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River and 89 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds west longitude are open to the commercial harvest of crabs.

LDWF Secretary Robert Barham ordered these reopenings following the completion of comprehensive testing by the FDA. The FDA advised that, following extensive sensory testing and analytical chemistry results, the crab samples tested from previously closed areas are safe for consumption.

The following areas remain closed to all commercial fishing, including commercial crabbing, until further notice:

All Louisiana commercial fishing closures including commercial crab closures east of Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River remain unchanged. LDWF does anticipate FDA approval to reopen commercial crabbing in this area within days.

The portion of state inside waters north of 29 degrees 23 minutes 00 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds north latitude from 89 degrees 50 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to the eastern shore of the Barataria Waterway, and

The portion of state inside and outside waters north of 29 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 22 minutes 00 seconds north latitude from 89 degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to 89 degrees 52 minutes 00 seconds west longitude, and

The portion of state inside and outside waters bounded by the following coordinates:

29 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds west longitude 
29 degrees 20 minutes 00 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds west longitude 
29 degrees 13 minutes 40 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 33 minutes 00 seconds west longitude 
29 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 32 minutes 30 seconds west longitude 
The portion of state inside and outside waters bounded by the following coordinates:

29 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 52 minutes 00 seconds west longitude 
29 degrees 21 minutes 00 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 52 minutes 00 seconds west longitude 
29 degrees 15 minutes 40 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 56 minutes 00 seconds west longitude 
29 degrees 17 minutes 10 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 57 minutes 30 seconds west longitude 
The portion of state inside and outside waters north of 29 degrees 08 minutes 15 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 11 minutes 40 seconds north latitude from 90 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to 90 degrees 07 minutes 00 seconds west longitude, and

The portion of state inside waters north of 29 degrees 09 minutes 00 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 12 minutes 50 seconds north latitude from the western shore of Bayou Lafourche westward to 90 degrees 17 minutes 50 seconds west longitude, and

The portion of state inside and outside waters north of 29 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 09 minutes 00 seconds north latitude from 90 degrees 13 minutes 30 seconds west longitude and the western shore of Bayou Lafourche westward to 90 degrees 34 minutes 00 seconds west longitude, and

The portion of state inside and outside waters north of 29 degrees 02 minutes 00 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 05 minutes 00 seconds north latitude from 90 degrees 37 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to 90 degrees 58 minutes 00 seconds west longitude

For maps detailing these commercial openings, click here
For detail sheet one, click here
For detail sheet two, click here
For detail sheet three, click here
For more information related to the oil spill, visit http://www.emergency.louisiana.gov. Connect with us on Facebook athttp://www.facebook.com/GOHSEP and on Twitter as @GOHSEP. View photos from the state's response efforts athttp://www.flickr.com/photos/lagohsep.

For more information contact Marianne Burke at mburke@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2917.

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Governor Jindal Announces Funding for Fishery Resource Monitoring Program, Calls on BP to Fund Long-Term Seafood Plan

Release Date: 08/18/2010

 

Today, Governor Bobby Jindal announced that BP has agreed to fund a three-year, $13 million fishery-resource monitoring plan and he also called on BP to fund the state's long-term comprehensive seafood certification and marketing plan that was submitted nearly two months ago. The Governor stressed that the fishery-resource monitoring plan is only a first step and BP's approval of a seafood certification and marketing plan is critical to ensuring the long-term viability of the seafood industry in Louisiana.

Governor Jindal said, "This is an important first step - and we thank BP for this investment. However, this is only a first step and we need the next step to happen in the next days or the next week - not next month or next year. We have been asking for approval of our comprehensive seafood safety and testing plan for months now and the time to act is now. This is one of the most critical issues facing our state as we work to recover from the effects of this spill.

"We must quickly put in place a comprehensive testing program that will give the public and the market predictability and confidence in our seafood industry. We want the world to know that Louisiana seafood is not only safe, but continues to be the best seafood in the world. The seafood industry is unique and integral to our economy and the very fabric of our state. We need BP to approve this plan in days, not months."

For the event, the Governor was joined by Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser, St. Bernard Parish President Billy Nungesser, Harlon's LA Fishing owner Harlon Pearce, Lake Pontchartrain Fisherman's Association Peter Gerica, Louisiana Restaurant Association President and Chief Executive Officer Jim Funk, Seafood Promotion and Marketing Board Executive Director Ewell Smith, Pascal's Restaurant Owner Mark DeFelice.

LONG-TERM SEAFOOD CERTIFICATION AND MARKETING PLAN

The state submitted the long-term seafood safety plan to BP on May 29th to fund the creation of a Louisiana Wild Seafood Certification Program that will enable the state to oversee seafood processing from catch to retail. This will allow Louisiana seafood harvesters and processors to certify that their products adhere to best practices, guaranteeing quality for American consumers and demonstrating that people in Louisiana stand behind their products.

The state's new, revised long-term seafood safety plan calls for an initial five-year cost of $173 million and there are automatic renewals based on objective criteria. Specifically, the initial five-year cost for this program totals $173 million. Three criteria will be used to determine the success of the initial five years of work. The first will be that tissue sample results show no indicators that oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill is present. The second is that landings of major species of seafood - shrimp, crabs, oysters and fish - are at or above pre-spill levels.  The third component is that markets are restored and the overall value of seafood is at or above pre-spill amounts. If these conditions are not met by the end of the fifth year, the state is asking BP to fund an additional three years of the project. The renewal will continue if these conditions are not met for up to 20 years

IMPORTANCE OF LOUISIANA'S SEAFOOD INDUSTRY

There are around 12,260 commercial fishing licenses in Louisiana and over 1,500 seafood dealers/processors and brokers in Louisiana.

Louisiana produces nearly one-third of the domestic seafood for the continental U.S. Seventy percent of the seafood production in the Gulf of Mexico comes from Louisiana fishers, shrimpers and oyster harvesters. Louisiana is second only to Alaska in terms of commercial fisheries production and home to three of the top seven commercial fishing ports in the country. In Louisiana, around one billion pounds of fisheries products worth over $272 million are produced every year.

In recent years, Louisiana commercial fishermen landed significant portions of the total U.S. commercial harvest, including 35 percent of shrimp, 36 percent of oysters, 56 percent of the Gulf menhaden, 27 percent of blue crab, 55 percent of black drum, 23 percent of all snapper species and 20 percent of yellowfin tuna.

FISHERY-RESOURCE MONITORING PROGRAM

The fishery-resource monitoring program will enable biologists from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) to conduct a three-year study on the effects of the oil spill on Louisiana's fisheries resources.  The core components of the plan include monitoring Louisiana's inshore aquatic resources, which will allow biologists to quantify the impact of the oil spill on inshore fishery resources by enhancing monitoring and sampling approaches.

This study also includes monitoring Louisiana's near shore aquatic resources, which will provide fishery-independent monitoring and assessment information essential to the management of Louisiana's Gulf of Mexico fisheries. This study also includes monitoring Louisiana's sensitive reef fish complex, which will help gather information on demographics of several native species of reef fish, including red snapper, on the Louisiana continental shelf. If damages around found after the three years of the study, the state can ask BP for an extension or use legal avenues available under the Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process.

For more information contact Joey Shepard at 225-765-2384 or jshepard@wlf.la.gov.

L.D.W.F. Announces Proposed Reintroduction of Non-migratory Whooping Cranes into Southwest Louisiana

Release Date: 08/18/2010

 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) will attempt to establish a non-migratory flock of whooping cranes that lives and breeds in the wetlands, marshes and prairies of southwestern Louisiana. If this proposal is approved, the reintroduction effort could begin during early 2011.

The process began today with an announcement in the Federal Register seeking public comment on a proposed rule to reintroduce the endangered whooping crane into habitat in its historic range on the state-owned White Lake Wetland Conservation Area in Vermilion Parish, Louisiana.

LDWF Secretary Robert Barham praised this lofty proposal to reintroduce whooping cranes back into the wetlands of the Chenier coastal plain. “Crane species around the world depend on coastal wetlands, and the proposed efforts would reunite this indigenous species back into some of the most productive and expansive coastal freshwater wetlands left in America,” he said.

The reintroduction is being proposed as part of an ongoing recovery effort for this highly imperiled species, which was on the verge of extinction in the 1940s and even today has only about 395 individuals in the wild (550 worldwide); none in Louisiana. The only self-sustaining wild population of whooping cranes migrates between Wood Buffalo National Park in the Northwest Territories of Canada and Aransas National Wildlife Refuge in Texas and, like those in the eastern populations, remains vulnerable to extinction from continued loss of habitat or natural or man-made catastrophes. Multiple efforts are underway to reduce this risk by increasing populations in the wild, including ongoing efforts to establish a migratory population in the eastern United States.

“With just under 400 birds in the wild, the vast majority of which winter along the Texas coast, whooping cranes are among our nation’s most threatened species. Our proposal to reintroduce a population in Louisiana would not only help protect this iconic species from extinction but would also help us take another big step in our campaign to restore the Gulf Coast’s wildlife, marshes, and coasts to health,” said Ken Salazar, Secretary of the Interior.

USFWS proposes the new, reintroduced, non-migratory population of whooping cranes be designated as a non-essential, experimental population (NEP) under the provisions of the Endangered Species Act. This proposed designation and its implementing regulation are developed to be more compatible with routine human activities in the reintroduction area. The designation allows for take of whooping cranes when such take is accidental and incidental to an otherwise lawful activity, including agriculture practices, recreation, and hunting. The intentional take (including killing or harm) of any NEP-designated whooping crane would still be a violation of federal law punishable under the Endangered Species Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

“LDWF’s wildlife biologists have decades of experience restoring wildlife and have led several successful wildlife restoration efforts including the American alligator, the brown pelican and the bald eagle,” said Robert Love, LDWF Coastal and Non-game Resources Division Administrator. “These are examples of coastal wildlife species which have been successfully restored, additional to white tailed deer, wild turkey and black bear populations, all upland species which have been, or are currently being restored.”

There are approximately 1.3 million acres of marsh, open water, and Chenier habitat in southwestern coastal Louisiana. The cranes would be reintroduced to the White Lake area and are not expected to be affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Whooping cranes historically occurred in Louisiana in both a resident, non-migratory flock and a migratory flock that wintered in Louisiana. The proposed release area is the location where whooping cranes were historically documented raising young in Louisiana.

“This reintroduction of a new non-migratory flock would not only restore the whooping crane to part of its historic range but also would provide another geographically distinct population,” said Cindy Dohner, USFWS Southeast Regional Director. “We look forward to continued work with our partners at the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries to aid in the recovery of this magnificent bird.”

Today’s Federal Register announcement includes the proposed rule. USFWS has drafted an environmental assessment (EA), which evaluates several alternatives for establishing a new non-migratory population of whooping cranes. USFWS is seeking comments on both documents, and also specifically the following: (1) the geographic boundary for the NEP; and, (2) effects of the reintroduction on other native species and the ecosystem.

To allow adequate time to conduct this review, USFWS requests that information be received on or before October 18. 2010. You may submit information by one of the following methods:

    http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/img/7x9/orange_arrow.gif); ">
  • Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments.
  • U.S. mail or hand-delivery: Public Comments Processing, Attn: FWS-R4-ES-2010-0057; Division of Policy and Directives Management; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 222; Arlington, VA 22203.
  • E-mails or faxes will not be accepted. All comments will be posted on http://www.regulations.gov. This generally means that any personal information provided will be posted.

LDWF and USFWS will hold public hearing at the following locations: Gueydan, Louisiana, on September 15, 2010 at the Gueydan Civic Center, 901 Wilkinson St., Gueydan, LA 70542; and in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on September 16, 2010 at the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 2000 Quail Drive Baton Rouge, LA 70808.

Each public hearing will last from 7:00-9:00 p.m. Before each hearing, an open house will be held to provide an additional opportunity for the public to gain information and ask questions about the proposed rule. All comments received at a public hearing, both verbal and written, will be considered in making a final decision.

For more information, contact Carrie Salyers at 337-538-2276 or csalyers@wlf.la.gov or Bill Brooks at 904-731-3136 or Billy_Brooks@fws.gov

2010-247

Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission Calls Special Meeting

Release Date: 08/17/2010

The Wildlife and Fisheries Commission has scheduled a special meeting for 11:00 A.M. on Friday, August 20, 2010, at the Wildlife and Fisheries Building, 2000 Quail Drive, Baton Rouge, LA.

 1. Roll Call

 2. Consideration of Declaration of Emergency and Notice of Intent to Allow Recreational Fishing Including Recreational Charter Boat Guides in all State Waters

 3. Consideration of Request to Appropriate Federal Agencies to Expedite the Opening of Closed Waters to Fishing

 4. Public Comments

 5. Adjourn

2010-245A

Louisiana Commercial Fishing Moves Forward with Additional State Water Openings

Release Date: 08/16/2010

Several areas of Louisiana's state waters were reopened Saturday, August 14 to commercial fishing in Lafourche, Terrebonne, Plaquemines and Jefferson parishes, showing more progress for Louisiana?s fishing industry.  The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) in coordination with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ordered an emergency reopening of commercial fishing areas previously closed due to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

LDWF Secretary Robert Barham ordered these re-openings following the completion of FDA?s comprehensive testing. The FDA advised that following extensive sensory testing and analytical chemistry results, seafood samples tested from previously closed areas were safe for consumption.

In addition to this news, Louisiana?s fall inshore shrimp season opened today at 6 a.m. in Shrimp Management Zones 1, 2 and 3. This opening was announced August 5 after approval from the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission.

"These latest openings are significant to Louisiana's fishing industry, on both economic and morale levels," stated LDWF Secretary Robert Barham. "With the fall inshore shrimp season opening today and Saturday's announcement of additional openings in state waters we are telling our fishermen, and the rest of the country, that progress is underway and we are getting back to business."

With Saturday's actions, adjustments were made to the areas closed to recreational fishing west of Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River. Those areas closed to commercial fishing now match the areas closed to recreational fishing. LDWF made these adjustments to align with areas reopened based on FDA testing and to allow LDWF enforcement agents to better monitor closed areas.

These openings do not include the commercial harvest of crabs and oysters. The FDA testing method for crabs takes significantly longer to process, therefore LDWF Secretary Barham chose a phased approach for opening commercial fishing. While LDWF continues to work closely with the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals to ensure the safety of Louisiana's seafood, these openings do not include the commercial harvest of oysters, as this activity is regulated by DHH.

All commercial and recreational closures east of Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River remain unchanged.

Commercial Fishing Reopening in Lafourche and Terrebonne Parishes
All state inside and outside waters from the western shore of Bayou Lafourche westward to the eastern shore of Oyster Bayou at 91 degrees 07 minutes 48 seconds west longitude will open to commercial fishing excluding the harvest of crabs and oysters effective Saturday, August 14, except in the following areas which will remain closed to commercial and recreational fishing until further notice due to continued presence of oil:

The portion of state inside waters north of 29 degrees 09 minutes 00 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 12 minutes 50 seconds north latitude from the western shore of Bayou Lafourche westward to 90 degrees 17 minutes 50 seconds west longitude, and

The portion of state inside and outside waters north of 29 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 09 minutes 00 seconds north latitude from 90 degrees 13 minutes 30 seconds west longitude and the western shore of Bayou Lafourche westward to 90 degrees 34 minutes 00 seconds west longitude, and

The portion of state inside and outside waters north of 29 degrees 02 minutes 00 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 05 minutes 00 seconds north latitude from 90 degrees 37 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to 90 degrees 58 minutes 00 seconds west longitude

Commercial Fishing Reopening in Plaquemines, Jefferson and Lafourche Parishes
All state inside and outside waters from the western shore of Southwest Pass at the Mississippi River and 89 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to the western shore of Bayou Lafourche will open to commercial fishing excluding the harvest of crabs and oysters effective Saturday, August 14, except in the following areas which will remain closed to commercial and recreational fishing until further notice due to continued presence of oil:

The portion of state inside waters north of 29 degrees 23 minutes 00 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds north latitude from 89 degrees 50 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to the eastern shore of the Barataria Waterway, and

The portion of state inside and outside waters north of 29 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 22 minutes 00 seconds north latitude from 89 degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to 89 degrees 52 minutes 00 seconds west longitude, and

The portion of state inside and outside waters bounded by the following coordinates:
1) 29 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds west longitude

2) 29 degrees 20 minutes 00 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds west longitude

3) 29 degrees 13 minutes 40 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 33 minutes 00 seconds west longitude

4) 29 degrees 15 minutes 00 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 32 minutes 30 seconds west longitude

The portion of state inside and outside waters bounded by the following coordinates:
1) 29 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 52 minutes 00 seconds west longitude

2) 29 degrees 21 minutes 00 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 52 minutes 00 seconds west longitude

3) 29 degrees 15 minutes 40 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 56 minutes 00 seconds west longitude

4) 29 degrees 17 minutes 10 seconds north latitude
89 degrees 57 minutes 30 seconds west longitude

The portion of state inside and outside waters north of 29 degrees 08 minutes 15 seconds north latitude and south of 29 degrees 11 minutes 40 seconds north latitude from 90 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds west longitude westward to 90 degrees 07 minutes 00 seconds west longitude

To report a suspected oiled catch to LDWF you are encouraged to call 1-866-577-1401. Please be prepared to give your name, fishing license number and coordinates of suspected oil. All claims are taken very seriously, and any person found falsifying claims would be dealt with to the full extent the law allows.

For more information contact Marty Bourgeois at 225/765-2401 ormbourgeois@wlf.la.gov.

2010- 243

Mississippi Men Cited for Overlimit Bass

Release Date: 08/15/2010

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement Division agents cited two Mississippi men on Aug. 13 for allegedly possessing over the legal limit of bass on the Mississippi river in Madison Parish.

Robert P. Herrington, 60, of Brandon, Miss., and Jerry H. Simpson, 61, of Terry, Miss., were found to be in possession of 30 largemouth bass. The daily limit for largemouth bass is 10 per person. Agents seized the bass and donated them to a local charity.

The penalty for overlimit of black bass is a fine up to $350, or jail time up to 30 days, or both plus court costs. A court order for restitution for the value of the illegally taken fish will also be filed with the case.

Agents involved in the case were Senior Agents, Lee Tarver, John Hendrix, Leya Grover and Brandon Miller.

For more information, contact Adam Einck at aeinck@wlf.la.gov or 225-765-2465.
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