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LDWF News Release

White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area 2018-19 Marsh and Rice Field Waterfowl Lottery Hunts Announced

Release Date: 08/16/2018

Aug. 16, 2018 – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) is now accepting applications for 2018-19 marsh and rice field waterfowl lottery hunts on White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area (WCA) in Vermilion Parish.
 
Marsh hunts are available on:
 
Nov. 14, 21, 24 and 25;
Dec. 20, 22, 23 and 27;
Jan.  2 and 15.
 
Rice field hunts are available on:
 
Nov. 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 18, 20, 24, 25, and 29;
Dec. 1, 2, 15, 16, 19, 22, 23, 27, 29 and 30;
Jan.  3, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 13, 16, 19, and 20.
 
Applicants must be 18 years of age or older and applications for both hunts must be received by 4:30 p.m. on Sept. 19.
 
Applications may be obtained by contacting any of LDWF's field offices or by visiting the LDWF website at http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/refuge/lottery-applications . Completed applications may be delivered in person to the LDWF headquarters building at 2000 Quail Drive, Room 418, Baton Rouge, La., 70808 or by mail to the same address.   Please note on envelope: Attention: White Lake Marsh (or Rice Field) Lottery Hunt, whichever is applicable.
 
Each application must include a non-refundable $5 administrative fee. The $5 fee must be paid by a check or money order payable (NO CASH ACCEPTED) to the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. Successful applicants will be notified by mail.
 
Selected applicants will be allowed two guests for the rice field hunts and one guest for the marsh hunts. An additional payment of $225 will be required for the rice field hunts and $350 for the marsh hunts.
 
For more information on White Lake WCA marsh and rice field waterfowl lottery hunts, contact Wayne Sweeney at 337-536-9400, ext. 1, or wsweeney@wlf.la.gov .
 

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Recreational Gray Triggerfish Season to Close at 11:59 p.m. on August 16

Release Date: 08/15/2018

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries announced the season for the recreational harvest of gray triggerfish will close in Louisiana waters at 11:59 p.m. on Thursday, August 16, 2018.  
 
NOAA Fisheries has determined the Gulf-wide recreational annual catch target of 217,100 pounds has been met, and announced a closure in Federal waters to prevent overfishing. The closure in Louisiana state waters provides consistency with federal regulations and assists with enforcement.  
 
The season is scheduled to re-open on March 1, 2019.
 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Secretary Jack Montoucet was authorized by the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission in previously promulgated rules to change or modify the opening and closing dates for any recreational reef fish season in Louisiana waters when notified of a modification to a season by NOAA Fisheries.  
 
For more information, contact Jason Adriance at (504) 284-2032 or jadriance@wlf.la.gov.

LDWF Continues Improvements to False River with the Installation of Gravel Fish Spawning Beds

Release Date: 08/15/2018

LDWF Continues Improvements to False River with the Installation of Gravel Fish Spawning Beds
LDWF Continues Improvements to False River with the Installation of Gravel Fish Spawning Beds

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, in cooperation with the Pointe Coupee Parish Police Jury, recently completed the installation of six new gravel spawning beds and the expansion of three existing beds on False River near New Roads. Siltation had previously covered much of the lake’s natural hard bottom that is essential for nesting sportfish, so the beds were installed to enhance fish spawning habitat.
 
State Rep. Major Thibaut was instrumental in obtaining the necessary funding to purchase the gravel. “This cooperation among state and local agencies, as well as private citizens, is vital for the continuation of restorative efforts in and around False River,” stated Rep. Thibaut. “These beds play an important role in the restoration of False River and promote the spawning of bass, bream and sac-a-lait.”
 
Approximately 70 tons of gravel was distributed throughout nine locations. Each spawning bed is roughly 400 square feet, designed in strips of 20-feet by 20-feet or 10-feet by 40-feet, and measuring in thickness of about 4 inches of gravel. 
 
Watershed drainage alterations during the 1970s and 1980s resulted in deterioration of the water quality, aquatic vegetation and fisheries. A watershed management plan was drafted in 2013, and updated in 2018, to address issues within the watershed. The plan draws from the expertise of many parish, state and federal agencies including LDWF, the Department of Natural Resources, the Department of Environmental Quality, the Department of Health and Hospitals, the Department of Agriculture and Forestry, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, as well as other local stakeholders.
 
With the completion of this project, a total of sixteen gravel spawning beds have been installed in the lake as part of the False River Restoration Plan.

 

Lydia Capritto, Cameron Dauzat Honored as 2017 Youth Hunters of The Year

Release Date: 08/14/2018

Cameron Dauzat (left) along with father David Dauzat.
Lydia Capritto with 21-pound turkey she harvested.

Aug. 14, 2018 - Lydia Capritto of St. Martinville and Cameron Dauzat of Effie were selected as the 2017 Louisiana Female and Male Youth Hunters of the Year. The Youth Hunter of the Year Program is a joint effort with the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, the Louisiana Wildlife Federation and the Louisiana Outdoors Writers Association.
 
The awards were presented at the Louisiana Outdoor Writers Association banquet Aug. 11 at the Clarion Inn Conference Center in Gonzales.
 
The Youth Hunter of the Year program is made possible by the generous donations from South LA Branch of the Quality Deer Management Association, the Baton Rouge Chapter of Delta Waterfowl, Andrew Harrison with Harrison Law, LLC, the Louisiana Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation, Louisiana Wildlife Federation, and Bowie Outfitters in Baton Rouge.
 
Capritto, 15 and the female winner, harvested a 21-pound turkey that featured a 12-inch beard and 1.25 inch spurs. She took the bird on March 18, 2017, in the Atchafalaya Basin during Louisiana’s youth turkey hunt weekend.
 
Capritto hunted with her father, Matthew Capritto, and friend, Celeste. They encountered mosquitos, a hooting owl and an otter.
 
The trio started at 4:30 a.m. and at daybreak they heard the hoot of an owl and two turkeys gobbling. They had to relocate after about an hour but their patience was rewarded.
 
“We heard sounds of a hen clucking nearby so Popa started calling back to the hen in hopes of attracting the gobbler,’’ Lydia said. “As the hen approached the decoys we heard the sound I was waiting for. It was the gobbler.’’
 
The turkey was soon in Lydia’s sight and she made good on her attempt, using a 20-gauge shotgun.
 
“Let me just say not only were my hands shaking but my knees were knocking,’’ Lydia said.
 
Dauzat, 12, took a small buck on an afternoon hunt with his father, David Dauzat, on Dec. 8, 2017, at Dewey W. Wills Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in central Louisiana.
 
What made the hunt even better, Cameron said, was that his father also harvested a deer.
 
“We couldn’t believe it,’’ Cameron said. “Two deer in one hunt. This was incredible and very rare. It really means a lot to me to kill a deer in the wild. But to kill two in one hunt is so special. It was worth all the time we spent scouting and sitting on the cold ground waiting for deer.’’
 
Cameron said he and his father were sitting in some tree bottoms when about five deer came through their area.
 
“I finally got a good look at one deer,’’ Cameron said. “I could tell that it was probably a small buck or doe. At that time of the year I could shoot anyone of these so I was excited. I didn’t move for several minutes, which felt like 20.’’
 
Cameron’s father okayed the shot and Cameron dropped the 90-pound buck with a 7 mm-08 Ruger American rifle. Seconds later, David harvested a doe in the group.
 
Cameron said what also made the hunt so rewarding was being able to hunt on public land.
 
“My family hunts the public lands because we are not fortunate to have private land,’’ Cameron said. “We spend many hours walking or boating in the WMAs. We learn the terrain and habits of the animals. This lets us know exactly where to set up a hunt.’’
 
The 2018 Youth Hunter of the Year contest application will be available soon.
 
For more photos, contact Rebecca Triche at rebecca@lawildlifefed.org or 225-344-6707.
 

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Recreational Red Snapper State Season To Close At 11:59 P.M. August 12, 2018

Release Date: 08/11/2018

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) announced that the state recreational red snapper season will close at 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, August 12, 2018. 

Preliminary estimates from the LA Creel survey indicate that the State’s quota of 743,000 pounds of red snapper for the private sector of the recreational fishery is projected to be harvested by August 12, 2018.  The Secretary of the Department has the authority to re-open the recreational season if finalized landings data indicate such harvest would be within the quota allowed under the Federal Exempted Fishing Permit.

This year, state and federal seasons are running concurrently because federal fisheries managers approved LDWF’s application for an Exempted Fishing Permit (EFP) to manage the private recreational snapper season in state and federal waters in 2018 and 2019. Under the EFP, participating anglers are allowed to fish red snapper in the state territorial seas and adjoining federal waters, from shore to 200 nautical miles.  

 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov. To receive recreational or commercial fishing email and text alerts, signup at http://www.wlf.la.gov/signup.

Louisiana Red Snapper Landings Estimates through July 29

Release Date: 08/10/2018

The latest catch statistics for recreational red snapper recorded by LA Creel, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries' near real-time landings data collection program, are 651,495 pounds, or 87 percent of Louisiana’s annual private recreational allocation of 743,000 pounds through July 29.

 

The current weekends-only season will continue to run until recreational landings approach or reach Louisiana’s allocation. 

 

This year, state and federal seasons are running concurrently because federal fisheries managers approved LDWF’s application for an Exempted Fishing Permit (EFP) to manage the private recreational snapper season in state and federal waters in 2018 and 2019. Under the EFP, participating anglers are allowed to fish red snapper in the state territorial seas and adjoining federal waters, from shore to 200 nautical miles. 

 

LDWF requests that recreational red snapper fishermen try out the tool developed to report catch electronically through the ROLP website or app. Though voluntary, reporting electronically will help us test this method of harvest data collection. Our goal is to continually improve our harvest data collection techniques to ensure our fishery resources are managed precisely and our fishermen have every possible opportunity to go out and catch fish. To get started on electronic reporting, go to wlf.louisiana.gov/snapper-efp-faqs and see question #14 (If I opt to participate in voluntary electronic reporting, how do I report my catch?). 
     
For more information on the 2018 red snapper season and detailed landing estimates, visit: 
wlf.louisiana.gov/red-snapper.

 

 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov. To receive email alerts, signup at http://www.wlf.la.gov/signup.

LDWF Announces White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area 2018 Youth Waterfowl Lottery Hunts

Release Date: 08/06/2018

Aug. 6, 2018 - The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) is accepting applications for the 2018 youth waterfowl lottery hunts on White Lake Wetlands Conservation Area (WCA) in Vermilion Parish.
 
There is no charge for the LDWF-sponsored hunts on Nov. 3 and Nov. 4, provided as a quality experience for young waterfowl hunters. The participants in the hunts will be determined by a lottery drawing.
 
Applications for the lottery should be submitted to LDWF before close of business on Sept. 14, 2018.
 
To be eligible, applicants must be between 10 and 17 years of age on the date of the hunt they select. In addition, all applicants must have a certificate showing they have satisfactorily completed an LDWF approved hunter education course.
 
Selected hunters must be accompanied in the blind by a parent or guardian, although the youth will be the only one permitted to possess a firearm.
 
Applications may be obtained by contacting any of LDWF's field offices or by visiting the LDWF website at http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/refuge/lottery-applications . Completed applications may be delivered in person to Room 418 of the LDWF headquarter building at 2000 Quail Drive in Baton Rouge, or sent by mail to:
 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Attention: White Lake Youth Waterfowl Hunt
2000 Quail Drive, Room 418
Baton Rouge, LA 70808
 
For more information on White Lake WCA youth waterfowl hunts, contact Wayne Sweeney at 337-536-9400, ext. 1 or wsweeney@wlf.la.gov .
 

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Check out the LDWF display at Lafayette South Regional Library

Release Date: 08/06/2018

Check out the LDWF display at Lafayette South Regional Library

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is encouraging area residents to view its display at the Lafayette South Regional Library at 601 Johnston St.

 

The display includes photographs and information about wildlife, including details about whooping cranes, bears, and fishing. It also includes an array of educational materials along with fun activities at LDWF Wildlife Management Areas.

 

“This exhibition is perfect for youth and adults. It covers a lot of the great activities we have in Louisiana and especially in the Lafayette Parish area,” said Wildlife and Fisheries Secretary Jack Montoucet.

 

For library hours visit the website at lafayettepubliclibrary.org or call 337-981-1028.

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov. To receive email alerts, signup at http://www.wlf.la.gov/signup.

LDWF Lafayette Office Opened; New Iberia, Opelousas Closed

Release Date: 08/06/2018

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries has completed the transition to our new regional office at 200 Dulles Drive, Lafayette, LA 70506.  LDWF staff from New Iberia and Opelousas are now housed at the new location.

The Lafayette office includes Enforcement, Wildlife, Marine Fisheries and Inland Fisheries staff at this single location. 

To locate and contact any of our field offices, visit http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/contact-us.

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov.To receive recreational or commercial fishing email and text alerts, signup at www.wlf.la.gov/signup.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Cautions Deer Hunters on Use of Deer Urine Lures

Release Date: 08/03/2018

Aug. 3, 2018 – The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is cautioning deer hunters about the use of deer urine lures because of the potential these products could contain chronic wasting disease (CWD). CWD is a neurodegenerative disease found in most deer species, including moose, elk, mule deer and white-tailed deer. It is infectious and always fatal.
 
CWD has not been discovered in Louisiana but has been in 25 states including Texas, Arkansas, and Mississippi.
 
Urine production and sale is not regulated by any state or federal agency. The production of these lures includes collecting urine through grates at captive cervid facilities. That allows mixing with saliva and feces, which typically have a higher CWD prion content than urine. The CWD prion is shed by infected animals through saliva, feces, urine, blood, antler velvet and decomposing carcasses.
 
LDWF Veterinarian Dr. Jim LaCour said there is no way to guarantee deer urine lure products do not contain the deadly disease. “There is no rapid, cost effective test to determine if commercial urine contains prions,’’ LaCour said.
 
Seven states have banned the use of deer urine lures, including Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Vermont and Virginia.
 
LDWF worked with the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission (LWFC) in 2017 to implement a carcass importation ban, a viable step in preventing the disease from entering the state via infected carcasses.
 
When CWD was discovered in a Mississippi deer near the Louisiana border in January of this year (2018), the LWFC enacted a feeding ban in order to minimize comingling of animals at feeder locations in East Carroll, Madison and Tensas parishes, parishes nearest to the discovery. Although that ban was rescinded in June, LDWF encourages hunters not to utilize supplemental feeds for hunting as this increases the chance of spreading diseases among animals using bait stations.
 
LDWF continues cooperative discussions with other state and federal agencies in the fight against CWD and to prevent it from entering the state.
 
Louisiana Congressman Ralph Abraham, M.D., R-Alto, introduced a bill in July aimed at stopping the spread of CWD. The bill would require the Secretary of Agriculture to partner with the National Research Council of the National Academies of Science (NRCNAS) to study and identify the ways CWD is transmitted between wild, captive and farmed cervids. This will provide a credible and scientifically-based foundation of understanding of the disease that can help end its spread.

 
CWD is part of a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and is similar to BSE (Bovine spongiform encephalopathy or mad cow disease) of cattle and scrapie in sheep. These diseases cause irreversible damage to brain tissue that leads to salivation, neurological symptoms, emaciation and death of the animal.
 
Deer infected with CWD can spread the disease even before symptoms develop. It can take one to two years for infected animals to become symptomatic. When symptoms appear, they can include emaciation, lethargy, abnormal behavior and loss of bodily functions. Other signs include excessive salivation, loss of appetite, progressive weight loss, excessive thirst and urination, teeth grinding and drooping ears.
 
LDWF has tested nearly 9,000 deer since 2002 and has not detected CWD in Louisiana. For more information, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/hunting/CWD.
 
 

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