Rapides


Wolff, Curtis L.

Name: 
Wolff, Curtis L.
City: 
Saint Landry
Phone: 
318-481-9073
Species/Jobs Worked: 
All

Hammatt, Kirk

Name: 
Hammatt, Kirk
City: 
Oakdale
Phone: 
318-335-2299
Species/Jobs Worked: 
Any furbearer

Duncan, Derrick M.

Name: 
Duncan, Derrick M.
City: 
Alexandria
Phone: 
318-790-1907
Species/Jobs Worked: 
All

Johnson, Christopher

Name: 
Johnson, Christopher
City: 
Leander
Phone: 
318-880-8573
Species/Jobs Worked: 
All, except bats

Perschy, Carl

Name: 
Perschy, Carl
City: 
Pineville
Phone: 
318-640-1377
Species/Jobs Worked: 
Beaver, otter, nutria, raccoon,possum,fox,bobcat, coyote

Woodworth Environmental Education Center

Intro: 
CENLA National Hunting and Fishing Day 2015 will be Saturday, September 26th. Come out and join us for this free, family friendly event. For more info go to: www.facebook.com/cenlanhfd
Woodworth Environmental Education Center
Woodworth Environmental Education Center

The Woodworth Environmental Education Center is located on the Alexander State Forest Wildlife Management Area in central Louisiana. This location also contains the Woodworth Shooting Range.  The Woodworth Env. Ed. Center is available for use by any group conducting environmental education programs.  Availability is on a first come, first serve basis, and all use must be scheduled in advance. 
The accomodations at the Woodworth Env. Ed. Center include a classroom, kitchen, dining room, sitting room, 40 person bunkhouse, bathrooms (including showers), as well as an outdoor pavilion w/ barbecue pit.  The facility is used extensively year round and reservations should be made well in advance.
For more information or to schedule a visit contact:
Phone: (318)484-2276
Email: rstroede@wlf.la.gov
Address:
661 Robinson Bridge Road
Woodworth, LA 71485

Alexandria LDWF Public Meeting on 2011-12 Hunting Season

Date: 
Wed, 03/09/2011

 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries will host a public meeting on the proposed 2011-12 Hunting Season dates and regulations on Wednesday, March 9, 2011 at 6 p.m. in the Alexandria Convention Hall located at 915 Third St., Alexandria, LA.  

Camp Beauregard

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana National Guard
Acreage: 
12,500 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 371-3050

Description:
Camp Beauregard Wildlife Management Area is primarily located in northeast Rapides Parish with some acreage in southeast Grant Parish. The area lies approximately eight miles north of Alexandria.
Camp Beauregard is 12,500 acres and is owned by the Louisiana National Guard. The primary use is as a troop training facility. The Louisiana National Guard also manages the timber for commercial production.
The terrain is characterized by gently rolling hills in the upland areas. The Flagon Creek bottom is a frequently flooded hardwood area of about 800 acres. The upland overstory is dominated by pine plantations. There are scattered hardwoods in the hills. Water oak, post oak, hickory, red oak and sweetgum are the most common species in creek bottom areas. The Flagon bottom is a typical bottomland forest with cypress, overcup oak and bitter pecan the dominant overstory species.
The understory development in the upland area varies considerably depending on the degree of overstory closure. Some plantations that have not been recently thinned have little if any understory. Those areas with good understory development support French mulberry, blackberry, greenbrier, yaupon, trumpet creeper, rattan and other browse plants. The Flagon bottom has swamp privet, water elm, mayhaw and swamp snowbell as the more common understory plants.
Game species available for hunting include squirrel, turkey, deer, rabbits, quail, dove, wood duck and woodcock. The only endangered species known to occur on the area is the red-cockaded woodpecker. However, at this time no known active colonies are present.
The areas first function is as a military reservation, therefore there are special regulations applying to use of Camp Beauregard WMA. An annual permit is required as is checking in and out of self-clearing stations on a daily basis. Limited camping is allowed by reservation only. Call (318) 641-3365 for questions about camping. General information is available from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 1995 Shreveport Highway, Pineville, LA 71360.

Alexander State Forest

Information
Owned: 
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Acreage: 
7,955 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(318) 371-3050

Description:
Alexander Forest Wildlife Management Area is located in south central Rapides Parish about ten miles south of Alexandria, off U.S. Highway 167, and one mile east of Woodworth.
The Louisiana Department of Agriculture, Office of Forestry is the owner of this 7,955 acre tract which is managed as commercial forest with an emphasis on experimental forestry techniques. Indian Creek Lake, a 2,600 acre reservoir, is located on the area along with a 300 acre recreation and camping area.
The forest overstory is predominantly loblolly pine with scattered stands of longleaf and slash pines. Much of the timber is managed as pine plantations. However, creek drainages have been maintained in hardwoods. In addition red oak, blackgum, sweetgum, hackberry, beech, water and willow oaks are widely scattered over the forest.
Game species available for hunting include deer, squirrel, rabbit, quail and waterfowl. The featured species on the area is white-tailed deer. Herd density is good with antler quality and body weights typical of piney woods sites. Hunter success during the either-sex muzzleloader hunts is generally above average.
An education center is owned and operated by the Department on a 17 acre site within the WMA. The center is used for a variety of educational programs. Two shooting ranges are located on the grounds. The 100 yard rifle and pistol range and a shotgun range are used in education programs and also available to the public during specified times. Information on range hours and fees is available at (318) 484-2212.
Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries operates two fish hatcheries adjacent to the WMA. These hatcheries are the primary source of fish for the statewide stocking program. Booker Fowler hatchery has a visitor center and offers hatchery group tours by appointment. For hatchery information call (318) 748-6914.
Two boat ramps are located on Indian Creek Lake. Sportfishing is the major activity on the lake. Water-skiing and swimming are also popular recreational uses. Camping facilities are operated and maintained by the Office of Forestry. Trailer and tent accommodations are available with electricity, water, bath houses and swimming areas. A fee is charged for the use of these facilities. For camping information telephone the Indian Creek Recreation Area at (318) 487-5058.
Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 1995 Shreveport Highway, Pineville, LA 71360.

Acadiana Conservation Corridor

Information
Owned: 
State of Louisiana
Acreage: 
2,285 Acres
Contact
Phone: 
(337) 948-0255

Description:
The Acadiana Conservation Corridor WMA is a tract of land situated in the parishes of St. Landry, Evangeline, Avoyelles, and Rapides, owned by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. This scenic easement area lying between the I-49 right-of-way westward to the Bayou Boeuf-Cocodrie Diversion Canal, begins just north of the community of Washington, La. in St. Landry Parish and extends northward through Evangeline Parish, Avoyelles Parish, and the southern portion of Rapides Parish. The entire length of this area is approximately 26 miles and comprises approximately 2285 acres. A small portion of private property is within the boundaries of the corridor, with the north boundary of this poperty starting at the railroad crossing near mile marker 48 on I-49 and the south boundary approximateely 1.3 miles from the railroad crossing. Access to this area is by boat only, with public boat launches available in the community of Wahington, La. on Bayou Courtableau and at Hwy. 29 on the west side of I-49. Self-clearing permits are available at these locations. The area is classified as bottomland hardwoods, with the main overstory species being bitter pecan, overcup oak sugarberry, swamp maple, water elm, and honey locust, with other species occasionally occurring. Understory vegetation is typical for such poorly drained lands, which has standing water for considerable periods after heavy rainfalls. Common species include deciduous holly, smilax, poison ivy, blackberry, dewberry, rattan, and peppervine, along with annual grasses and sedges. Palmettos are present throughout the understory. Hunting on the Acadiana Conservation Corridor WMA is limited to deer by bowhunting only. No other hunting is allowed on this easement area. No firearms are allowed on this area. Additional information may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries at 5652 Hwy. 182 Opelousas, La. 70570.

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