Tangipahoa


Dryopteris ludoviciana

Dryopteris ludoviciana
Dryopteris ludoviciana
Class: 
Ferns and Fern Allies
Family: 
Dryopteridaceae
Scientific Name: 

Dryopteris ludoviciana

Common Name: 
Southern Shield Wood-fern
GRANK: 
G4
SRANK: 
S2

Maurepas Swamp WMA

Acreage

124,567

Contact

fburks@wlf.la.gov; 985-543-4781; 42371 Phyllis Ann Dr, Hammond, LA 70403

Parish

Ascension, Livingston, St. John the Baptist, St. James, Tangipahoa

Owner/manager

LDWF

Description

Maurepas Swamp WMA is mostly flooded cypress tupelo swamp. Water levels in this area are influenced by rain, wind, and tides. Heavy rains accompanied with east winds can cause extensive flooding in the area for days at a time. Other vegetation found on the WMA includes bulltongue, cattail, submerged aquatics, red maple, American elm, sugarberry, and nuttall, water, and obtusa oak. Invasive species include water hyacinth, Bidens sp. “fourchette”, and an aquatic fern known as common salvinia. The presence of this invasive vegetation has made much of the area unsuitable for the large numbers of waterfowl that historically overwintered in this vast swamp.

Future plans for the WMA include cooperative freshwater reintroduction projects designed to revive the swamp and improved control of invasive plant species that have overtaken much of this important and scenic area.

Maurepas Swamp WMA consists of two tracts totaling some 61,633 acres donated to LDWF by the Richard King Mellon Foundation in the summer of 2001, 12,000 acres of acquisitions and donations between 2002 and 2011, an additional 29,630 acres (M.C. Davis Tract) acquired from the Conservation fund in early 2012, and subsequent property acquisitions, including the Rathborne, Boyce, and Crusel tracts.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: The most sought after game species on Maurepas Swamp WMA are white-tailed deer, squirrel, rabbit, and waterfowl. There are youth deer and squirrel seasons. While you may use ATVs to retrieve game on much of the WMA, you many not use motorized vehicles on the Crusel Tract. See regulations for details.

Fishing and boating: Common freshwater fish include largemouth bass, sunfish, and crappie. See regulations for details.

Camping: There are two tent-only camping areas; one is on the New River Canal and the other on Reserve Canal.

Birding and wildlife viewing: Bald eagles and osprey nest in and around the WMA. Numerous species of neotropical migrant birds use this coastal forest habitat during fall and spring migrations. Resident birds, including wood ducks, black-bellied whistling ducks, egrets, and herons can be found on the WMA year-round.

Hiking: A ½-mile long nature trail is located on the east side of U.S. Hwy 51, approximately ½ mile north of Peavine Road in LaPlace.

Directions

Maurepas Swamp WMA is located approximately 25 miles west of New Orleans, along the south shore of Lake Maurepas west of Sorrento. You can access the area by boat via the Blind River and the Reserve Flood Relief Canal. You can also access on foot; major highways crossing through the area include I-10, I-55, U.S. Hwy 51, and LA Hwy 641. There are 16 self-clearing permit stations located throughout the WMA.

Joyce WMA

Acreage

27,965

Contact

fburks@wlf.la.gov; 985-543-4781; 42371 Phyllis Ann Dr, Hammond, LA 70403

Parish

Tangipahoa

Owner/manager

LDWF, Tangipahoa Parish School Board

Description

Joyce WMA is a wetland within the Pontchartrain Basin; it mainly consists of cypress-tupelo swamp. A large portion of the area is a dense shrub marsh community with red maple, wax myrtle, red bay, and younger cypress-tupelo. There is a 500-acre freshwater marsh, mainly of maiden cane, on the northern portion of the WMA. There is a Limited Access Area located in the northwestern corner; the use of internal combustion engines is prohibited in this area year-round.

In 1982, the Joyce Foundation donated the 12,809 acres that originally comprised Joyce WMA. In 1994, the Guste Heirs donated an additional 2,250 acres. LDWF acquired the 8,364-acre Salmen/Octavia Tract in 2008 and the 2,729-acre Dendinger Tract in 2010. LDWF leases an additional 484 acres from the Tangipahoa Parish School Board.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Popular game species on Joyce WMA include white-tailed deer, waterfowl, rabbit, and squirrel. There is a youth deer season. See regulations for details.

Fishing and boating: Nearby boat launches include one at North Pass at U.S. Hwy 51, Lee’s Landing, and Traino Landing, south of LA Hwy 22. Common freshwater fish available on Joyce WMA include largemouth bass, sunfish, and catfish. Frogging is also available. See regulations for details.

Birding and wildlife viewing: Popular for birding, Joyce WMA is a site along the American Wetlands Birding Trail. Bald eagles and osprey nest in and around the WMA. Numerous other species of birds, including neotropical migrants, use this coastal forest during fall and spring migrations. Resident waterfowl, including hooded mergansers and wood, mottled, and black-bellied whistling ducks, are found on the area year-round. LDWF maintains and monitors more than 50 wood duck nesting boxes on the area.

Alligators and a variety of other reptiles and amphibians are common on Joyce WMA. LDWF constructed an elevated “Swamp Walk” boardwalk in 1990 to provide WMA visitors with an opportunity to view the swamp interior and observe the associated wildlife and vegetation. LDWF renovated the boardwalk after it was damaged by Hurricane Isaac.

Directions

Joyce WMA is located 5 miles south of Hammond. Access to the interior of the property is limited; there are no roads that lead into the swamp. Several abandoned logging canals enter the area from the west off of U.S. Hwy 51; however, these canals are narrow and travel is limited to pirogues and canoes and only during moderate to high water periods. Access by outboard motor is limited to the upper reaches of Middle and Black Bayous as well as the Tangipahoa River and Bedico Creek. There is a public boat launch on North Pass at U.S. Hwy 51. Other access points include Lee’s Landing and Traino Landing, south of LA Hwy 22. There are self-clearing permit stations throughout the WMA.

Sandy Hollow WMA

Acreage

4,655

Contact

fburks@wlf.la.gov; 985-543-4781; 42371 Phyllis Ann Dr, Hammond, LA 70403

Parish

Tangipahoa

Owner/manager

LDWF, Tangipahoa Parish School Board

Overview

The terrain on Sandy Hollow WMA is mostly rolling hills with young longleaf pine; there is only a small portion with mature trees. Hardwoods are the main species in the few creek bottoms.

LDWF owns 4,473 acres of the WMA and leases the remaining 182 acres from the Tangipahoa Parish School Board. The WMA is divided into three separate tracts near Wilmer—the larger tract is north of LA Hwy 10, a smaller one is south of Hwy 10, and the third is south of Hwy 10 and east of Hwy 1061.

LDWF primarily manages the area for upland game birds such as quail and dove. LDWF is also creating wildlife openings to increase wildlife use on the WMA, as well as hunter success. Although Sandy Hollow WMA is small compared to other WMAs, it is a valuable research area; LDWF conducts numerous habitat, game, and non-game studies on the WMA.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting: Quail, dove, and woodcock hunting are good. There is a small game emphasis area and field trial courses and trails on the WMA. Deer, turkey, and squirrel hunting are fair due to limited habitat. There are youth deer and squirrel seasons and a youth dove hunt. See regulations for details.

In addition, there is a physically challenged deer season. Click here for a physically challenged hunter permit application and additional information.

Directions

Sandy Hollow WMA is located approximately 10 miles northeast of Amite.

Tangipahoa Parish School Board WMA

Acreage

1,643

Contact

fburks@wlf.la.gov; 985-543-4781; 42371 Phyllis Ann Dr, Hammond, LA 70403

Parish

Tangipahoa

Owner/manager

LDWF leases the property from Tangipahoa Parish School Board

Description

LDWF has leased small, scattered tracts of land that make up this WMA from the Tangipahoa Parish School Board since April 2003. The intent of both parties is to better manage wildlife and ensure continued public access to this land.

The first tract is located in the center of Tangipahoa Parish, south of LA Hwy 16; it contains 347 acres of upland pine habitat actively managed for loblolly pine timber production. There are timber stands of various ages with scattered hardwoods. The second tract is also found south of LA Hwy 16. This 649-acre tract is bordered on the east by Hillcrest School Road. Habitats include longleaf and loblolly pine and mixed pine/hardwoods. The third tract is located north of LA Hwy 38, near Lewiston. It contains 647 acres of longleaf and loblolly pine and mixed pine/hardwoods.

Activities and Amenities

Hunting and trapping: Available game species include white-tailed deer, turkey, squirrel, rabbit, mourning dove, bobwhite quail, and woodcock. See regulations for details.

Other: hiking, photography, birding

Directions

Access the first tract via Neal Road west of Briar Patch Road and LA Hwy 445. Head south on Dummyline Road at Sharon M.B. Church to access the second tract. Access the third tract via Brumfield Lane. You must have a self-clearing permit to access any of these tracts.

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